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Hardy:
You gotta be kidding. "Tin" and "teen" are pronounced quite differently from each other, and the difference is exactly that ... barely.) If I heard someone say "teen" when they meant "tin", I would find it jarringly conspicuous. Mike Hardy

Did you people never learn short and long vowel sounds? "Tin" is short "I"; "teen" is long "I". Ten is short "E".
I see Joey has attained Bun Mui status a feeder of straight lines.

For those AUErs who also read AFU: don't you want to introduce Joey to Jami JoAnne and see what happens?

That's funny! Maybe they'll save the Bettas together.

Mike Nitabach
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
} On Thu, 15 Jan 2004 19:27:43 -0500, R F

}
} ( . . . )
}
}> I think I've heard something that might be related in certain Midland }> accents, but not necessarily for /I/ before /N/. I know one }> (Midland-region) Hoosier who says "get 'im" as what sounds to me like }> "get eem".
}
} I think that's the normal pronunciation in Postwar Northern } Utah Prestige Standard. Anyway, it's the way I think I say } it. I also pronounce the "ish" in "English" (iS) (roughly, } "eesh").
I don't know about your "him", but I happened to have a sample of your "English" handy, and it strikes me as a solid ('iNglIS). That's not to say you don't pronounce it with an (iS) (roughly, "eesh") at other times, but this one was a rock solid KAI (IS) (roughly, "ish"), at a spot where I wouldn't be too surprised if someone popped an (@S).

R. J. Valentine
(who's sorry to appear to disagree when he so often agrees)
} Hardy:
}
}>You gotta be kidding. "Tin" and "teen" are pronounced }>quite differently from each other, and the difference is exactly }>that between "bit" and "beat". (Smaller then the difference }>between "tin" and "ten", I think, but just barely.) If I heard }>someone say "teen" when they meant "tin", I would find it }>jarringly conspicuous. Mike Hardy
}
} Did you people never learn short and long vowel sounds? "Tin" is short "I"; } "teen" is long "I".
Oy!
} Ten is short "E".
How about "Tet" and "Ted"? Are they both short e's?

R. J. Valentine
Hardy:

You gotta be kidding. "Tin" and "teen" are pronounced quite ... "tin", I would find it jarringly conspicuous. Mike Hardy

Did you people never learn short and long vowel sounds? "Tin" is short"I"; "teen" is long "I". Ten is short "E".

No. The "I" sounds are different in quality, not simply length, as you can confirm by trying to elongate the "tin" sound without changing the quality of the sound: the result won't be "teen" (or at least it isn't for me). Or you can try saying "sheet" and "sheep" quickly: they won't magically turn into "***" and "ship". That's why the IPA/ASCII system has separate symbols: (i) or elongated to (iEmotion: smile for the "teen" sound, (I) for the "tin" sound.
People whose own languages don't have (I) and (i) as a minimal pair find the sheet/*** sheep/ship distinction in English very hard to recognise and imitate, which can lead to amusement on one side and embarrassment on the other.
If "ten" has a "short E", what would be an example of a "long E"? If you simply lengthen the vowel of "ten", you'll get (in my RP version of BrE) approximately the vowel of "air" but only approximately: the sound of "air", even in the non-rhotic RP BrE,
is more complicated that that.
Alan Jones
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
ObAUE: Why is the Salvation Army called the "Sally Anne"?

I want to know why the Salvation Army flag has an eight pointed star (seven points not good enough?). Speaking of pledges ...

"I pledge allegiance
To the Christian Flag
And to the Saviour,
For whose Kingdom it stands.
One Saviour, crucified,
risen and coming again,
With life and liberty
for all who believe."
Another interesting flag is BVI's, which (according to legend) is always flown with St. Ursula upright to honor her virginity.

http://fotw.vexillum.com/flags/vg.html
Lieblich's Law: No query addressed to AUE is so foolish, inane, or ignorant that it cannot elicit at least one serious answer.

Speaking of famous Doctors, every time I go to the beach I wonder who Dr. Zogg was.
ObAUE: Why is the Salvation Army called the "Sally Anne"?

I want to know why the Salvation Army flag has an eight pointed star (seven points not good enough?).

According to the organization,
The present star is eight-pointed; the number has been varied from time to time but no significance has ever been attached to this.

http://tinyurl.com/2xvjk

They also note that
Until 1882 the central shape was a sun, but when a plan to open the Army's work in India was put into action it was found that the Parsees, an Indian religious sect regarded the sun as sacred and so it was changed to a star.
So it seems that they were trying to find something that wasn't a sacred symbol to anybody. It wouldn't surprise me if you had to get up to eight points before you found a star that fit the bill.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >If you think health care is
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >expensive now, wait until you seePalo Alto, CA 94304 >what it costs when it's free.

(650)857-7572
http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
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Evan:
OK, thanks. I get it now. I think I know that company as "Johnson & Johnson".

I doubt it. Johnson & Johnson was founded in 1886 in New Brunswick, NJ, by Robert Wood Johnson and Edward Mead Johnson (and James Wood) to make surgical dressings.

No!! I can't believe you don't know what "Johnson & Johnson" is! They make like baby powder and stuff! Is SC Johnson different than Johnson & Johnson?

And HTF does any of this involve the guy who wrote dictionaries? Plus, he's NOT the ONLY DOCTOR JOHNSON! So there!
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