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Any differences between them? Thanks.

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Only one is grammatical: Internationally famous star. (The person is not only a star in their own country, but all over the world.)

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yzh1978

Any differences between them? Thanks.

I see "famous" as redundant in "international famous star" (the noun "star" implies being famous).

And the phrase "internationally famous star" seems to me pleonastic as well.

I'd use the noun phrase "international star" instead.

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 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.

Thanks ,but I googled the phrase" famous international star", it exits ! How to explain it ?

yzh1978

Thanks ,but I googled the phrase" famous international star", it exits ! How to explain it ?

That wasn't one of the phrases you asked about earlier, and it is indeed grammatical, though as tkacka observed, using "famous" and "star" together is redundant. I would recommend against relying on Google matches to determine whether a phrase is good English, though. There is plenty of poorly-written English on the internet, and Google can often find matches for phrases that no native speaker is likely to use.

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