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Hi i happend to read New York Times’s article and found this sentence. It reads‘ Even the N.C.A.A, which had long opposed the sports betting it then litigated all the way to the supreme court, had begrudgingly accepted that the wagers would be a part of American life in one form or another’

First off, this sentence seems a little bit off to me. So i ask cordially you guys to tell me if it’s right sentence. And if not, could you explain what this sentence gets wrong??

Thanks in advance

For my part, i have no idea why ‘it’ is in that sentence

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This sentence is quite awkward to read. The only way I can make sense of it is if there is an implied "that".

Even the N.C.A.A, which had long opposed the sports betting that it [= the NCAA] then litigated all the way to the supreme court, had begrudgingly accepted that the wagers would be a part of American life in one form or another.

Comments  

You left out the period after the second "A", but it is often spelled with none at all.

"It" is the NCAA. The NCAA "then litigated" sports betting, but I find that phrasing awkward and hard to understand. "Then" seems lazy (when?), and they didn't litigate sports betting. They litigated some lawsuit or other concerning sports betting. This is sports journalism, renowned for its iffy English, but you have to remember that they work to impossible deadlines every day, so we should cut them some slack.

 GPY's reply was promoted to an answer.