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Hi. I think it is right to say that an intransitive verb can't have a passive form and I think the words "sleep" and "vanish" are intransitive verbs.

I think it also is correct to say that for a transitive verb the participle part of what seems to be a passive verb could be an adjective as in "His work is done." Here, I think the participle "done" in what seems (looks) to be the passive verb form "is done" is an adjective.

Going back to the issue of intransitive verbs and what I think are two examples, the words "sleep" and "vanish," would you say these are not correct?

1. He is vanished.

2. He is slept.

I think no. 2 is incorrect, but for no. 1, I think the verb "vanished" carries the sense of an adjective (I could be mistaken) and seems not to be part of a passive structure. If that is an adjective, could that be a valid ground for an exception to what I think is the general rule that an intransitive verb can't be (have??) a passive form?
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Anonymousdoubtful to you that the past participle form of intransitive nouns like "vanish" and "sleep" could function as adjectives?
Just as an aside, we should remark the difference between the present and past participles in this respect.
The intransitive "to sleep" (no transitive usage) gives us the common adjective, "the sleeping princess," but "the sleeped princess," and "She is sleeped " are not used.

(In the sentence "She is sleeping," I don't think "sleeping" is an adjective, but rather a present participle as a component of the present continuous tense:
She sleeps; She is sleeping; She does sleep.
I think "to be plus adjective" would be a bit of a stretch here.)
Hi. I think the following are correct as phrases, with past participles of the two intransitive verbs "appear" and "wait" functioning/acting as adjectives in a pre-noun position. I think the words "wait" and "appear" are intransitive verbs.

1. a much waited dance performance

2. a much appeared news item
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<< 1. a much waited dance performance 2. a much appeared news item >>

Sadly, I don't recognize either of them.

I'd say, "a much awaited dance performance"
and
"an oft appearing news item"

While these non-finite verbals supposedly have no tense, there does seem to be a difference between the past and present participles. The "awaiting" seems to have taken place in the past, while the "appearing" seems to be continuing in the present.

Best wishes, - A.
These are past participles used passively as adjective, aren't they?

A much deserved vacation...

A desparately needed supply is on the way...

A recently discovered oil reserve off the coast of...
Yes, they are, and (I presume you realize) their verbs are transitive:
I deserve a vacation.
I need supplies.
I discover oil every year.

In each of these sentences, the verb takes a direct object.

Rgdz, - A.
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AvangiKing James' boys came up with "He is risen, as he said,"
In 1611 the perfect aspect was not established in English the way it is today. In modern translations they use "he has been raised".

A native might be able to pull off this archaic construction for effect but I would advise any foreigner to steer well clear of it as to most listeners it will just sound like incorrect English.
Well said.
HuevosA native might be able to pull off this archaic construction for effect but I would advise any foreigner to steer well clear of it as to most listeners it will just sound like incorrect English.
Amen.

CJ
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dimsumexpressThese are past participles used passively as adjective, aren't they?

A much deserved vacation...

A desparately needed supply is on the way...

A recently discovered oil reserve off the coast of... I may have been too hasty here. What do you mean by "used passively?"

I can reaffirm the rest of it, but I guess I missed the "used passively." Emotion: embarrassed

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