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Hi. I think it is right to say that an intransitive verb can't have a passive form and I think the words "sleep" and "vanish" are intransitive verbs.

I think it also is correct to say that for a transitive verb the participle part of what seems to be a passive verb could be an adjective as in "His work is done." Here, I think the participle "done" in what seems (looks) to be the passive verb form "is done" is an adjective.

Going back to the issue of intransitive verbs and what I think are two examples, the words "sleep" and "vanish," would you say these are not correct?

1. He is vanished.

2. He is slept.

I think no. 2 is incorrect, but for no. 1, I think the verb "vanished" carries the sense of an adjective (I could be mistaken) and seems not to be part of a passive structure. If that is an adjective, could that be a valid ground for an exception to what I think is the general rule that an intransitive verb can't be (have??) a passive form?
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Comments  (Page 3) 
What I meant was these past participles are used passively which to some are adjectives. I guess the question really boiled down to the classification of the P.P. I always treated them with a passive approach which may or may not conform to the grammarian rules.

I need supplies despartely. Supplies are needed desparately. The desparately needed supplies are on their way to the disasterous area.

You have worked hard over the years, you deserve a vacation, a well deserved vacation!

Recently scientists have discovered oil deposits off the coast.....This discovered site is believed to the second biggest in US history.
dimsumexpress I guess the question really boiled down to the classification of the P.P. I always treated them with a passive approach which may or may not conform to the grammarian rules.
Unfortunately, as I see it at least, this thread is not about whether a word that looks like a past participle should be classified as a verb (in a passive construction) or as an adjective, though there are plenty of threads on that subject. Rather, it's about whether past participles of intransitive verbs (which can never appear in a passive construction, by the way) are generally usable as adjectives. Examples:

*the slept man
*a belonged wallet
*a left guest
*the gone people
*the arrived women
*a disappeared rabbit
*a died geranium

On the basis of just the few examples above, I don't think we can conclude that the past participles of intransitive verbs are generally usable as adjectives.

Emotion: geeked
CJ
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Hi. Could the underlined "once-disappeared" be correct? Let us be completely hypothetical for the sake of getting some clear answers (or an answer) to the above question. Could you correct any grammatical mistakes to this made-up story while you are at it? Thank you for your anticipated help.

A made-up story (for the purpose of asking the above question):

A woman was living with a person at a house and she called her a friend, Jane Doe. After XX years together, this friend disappeared. Jane left no note and didn't say anything to anyone about the matter. Then, suddenly about XX days after her disappearance, Jane appeared smiling in the door step and said, "Hi, I am here and glad I am at our house." Totally astonished, she couldn't utter a word for a moment.... This once-disappeared friend had appeared to her total surprise.
CalifJim
*the slept man

*a belonged wallet

*a left guest

*the gone people

*the arrived women

*a disappeared rabbit

*a died geranium


Hi CJ,

I get our point. I have no argument about intransitive participles not being able to appear in passive constructions. I merely tossed in my two cents on the participle usage.

A fabricated story after being repeated enough times can become the absolute truth. This particular participle is the kind that can be preceived as adjective, or a noun phrase with passive cocnstruction, depending on one's English training. As I said before, this is my approach which works for me but may not be agreed with by the traditional rules.
AnonymousCould the underlined "once-disappeared" be correct?
I would understand it, but I would not consider it, strictly speaking, correct. disappeared is almost a special case. It is a borrowing from Spanish. In Argentina some years ago, people who were considered politically troublesome were being rounded up and taken away by the authorities, and presumably executed. Their families referred to them as "the disappeared". American newspapers translated the term literally rather than changing it to something more grammatical in English. So the word disappeared in that sense entered into English. Whether it will stay is not certain.

CJ
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Hi. As to the sentence "He is vanished" (which I wrote some time ago - many months ago) in the original post, I feel, eventhough the word "vanish" is intransitive, it could be used as a partciple adjective (I could be mistaken, though).

I think this looks correct.

He is already vanished.

And here, the adverb (I think it is) "already" modifies the word "vanished" and I think that might add strength to my position that the word "vanished" could be (function?) a participle adjective.

Also, please look at the following and tell me if the following (which seem to the participle forms of the intransitive verbs "theme" and "stiffen") are correct as participle adjectives (I am not sure about both of them but I think one of them, named "themed", could be transitive).

a themed greeting card

the stiffened end
Anonymous He is vanished
This sounds natural to one who often reads the King James Bible, but I believe it's considered archaic.