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Hello,

I have asked the same given question here before.

1. He is a teacher.

2.The apples taste sweet.

3. He weighs 30 kilos.

Are these senetnces in active or passive voice?

Mr.clive answered it, but did not tell whether all three sentences are active or passive.

I asked a person who is my senior at office.

He told " They are active, since all contain intransitive verbs, which possess only the active voice."

I could not understand the meaning what he wanted to say and also could not date to ask it as he is very senior to me.

Any here could explain the meaning of his logic( written in bold letters)?

Thanks.
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Comments  
Verbs can be classified according to whether they are transitive or intransitive.
(If they take a direct object, they are transitive. Otherwise they are intransitive.)

John threw the ball. (transitive - You can throw something. The direct object is "the ball")
Mary slept. (intransitive - You can't "sleep something". You just sleep - all by yourself! There is no direct object.)

Sentences with transitive verbs can occur in two voices: active and passive.
In the active voice, the agent (person doing the action) is the subject of the sentence.
In the passive voice, the patient (thing acted upon by the agent) is the subject of the sentence, and the agent occurs (if at all) in a "by" phrase.

Active: John threw the ball. (The agent - John - is the subject.)
Passive: The ball was thrown by John. (The patient - the ball - is the subject. The agent occurs in a "by" phrase.)

Sentences with intransitive verbs can only occur in one voice: active.
This is because (by definition) they have no direct objects, so there is no direct object to use as a subject of a passive sentence.

Active: Mary slept.
Passive: NONE -- You can't say "Was slept by Mary". Emotion: smile

CJ
CalifJimVerbs can be classified according to whether they are transitive or intransitive.
(If they take a direct object, they are transitive. Otherwise they are intransitive.)

CJ

What about ditransitive verbs?
Try out our live chat room.
What about them? How would you classify them?
Do you think a ditransitive verb would be a kind of transitive verb or a kind of intransitive verb?

CJ
CalifJimWhat about them? How would you classify them?
Do you think a ditransitive verb would be a kind of transitive verb or a kind of intransitive verb?

CJ

A kind of transitive?
Twice as transitive...
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
tritransitives being thrice as transitive, i bet?

sam
MrPedanticTwice as transitive...

And ergatives? What are they?
I call them "ARRGGHHatives" because every time I try to understand them myself, I end up saying "ARRGH"! Emotion: smile

I once read an account of how the term "ergative" got started, what it meant at the time, how its meaning changed, and what it supposedly means now. Very frustrating! I will let someone else respond to this.

CJ
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