+0
Hi,

are there really verbs that are not used intransitively? That is, transitive verbs that are never used intransitively, not even when speaking casually on in general?

One example, according to my dictionaries (Merriam Webster too), seems to be the verb "simplify". It's only considered as a transitive verb.
Well, here's a short paraghraph I just made up, can you take a look at it? I used the verb "simplify" intransitively.

When writing a flash card, you should try to simplify the definition of the word you want to learn as much as possible. You will learn how to use it and all the subtleties over time, by practicing, not directly by reading the flash card. So don't lose time trying to find perfect definitions, don't include too many details that will be difficult to remember. Simplify as much as you can.

In this case, it's just used in general, to mean "simplify matters", or "simplify everything you can simplify", and the object is implicit.

Thank you in advance. Emotion: smile
1 2
Comments  
Well, here seem to be 3 solely transitive verbs that I found quickly on a grammar website:

INCOMPLETEThe shelf holds.COMPLETEThe shelf holds three books and a vase of flowers.INCOMPLETEThe committee named.COMPLETEThe committee named a new chairperson.INCOMPLETEThe child broke.COMPLETEThe child broke the plate.
You might note that many (such as 'hold') are intransitive with some meanings and intransitive with others. Should they be considered the same or different words?
KooyeenSimplify as much as you can.
But should this be considered truly intransitive just because it has an implied object, and not a stated one?

It seems to me that an intransitive would not have any object, not even the possibility of an implied object.

He slept.

CJ
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Hi,

Yet not so fast.Emotion: smile

A reference from the classics

soon he slept the sleep of the just

http ://robert-louis-stevenson.classic-literature.co.uk/st-ives/ebook-page-56.asp

Some contemporary writing

Bruce Wayne; the original Batman, who had fought against all odds and won as the caped crusader, had finally fallen to the enemy that claimed all life in the end: death. You can only cheat it for so long. He didn’t go down in a blaze of glory - oh no - he went quietly out into the night as he slept the sleep of the just.

http://www.fanfiction.net/s/1031349/1/Tomorrows_Prey

Clive
Hi. Would you say the auxiliary verb (hope it is an auxilary verb) 'had' is implicit in the part after the word 'and' and before the word 'won' in the sentence you introduced in the following (looks to be from an online web source)?

You introduced this in your last post:

Some contemporary writing

Bruce Wayne; the original Batman, who had fought against all odds and won as the caped crusader, had finally fallen to the enemy that claimed all life in the end: death. You can only cheat it for so long. He didn’t go down in a blaze of glory - oh no - he went quietly out into the night as he slept the sleep of the just.

http://www.fanfiction.net/s/1031349/1/Tomorrows_Prey

Would you find this sentence incorrect? Or could it be that one past perfect tense is enough and don't need to follow up with a second past perfect tense? ( I am not sure whether i wrote my question correctly to reflect what I wanted to say, though.)

Joe was happy. He had entered a contest the day before and (had?) won a medal.
Hi,

Would you say the auxiliary verb (hope it is an auxilary verb) 'had' is implicit in the part after the word 'and' and before the word 'won' in the sentence you introduced in the following (looks to be from an online web source)? Yes.

You introduced this in your last post:

Some contemporary writing

Bruce Wayne; the original Batman, who had fought against all odds and won as the caped crusader, had finally fallen to the enemy that claimed all life in the end: death. You can only cheat it for so long. He didn’t go down in a blaze of glory - oh no - he went quietly out into the night as he slept the sleep of the just.

http://www.fanfiction.net/s/1031349/1/Tomorrows_Prey

Would you find this sentence incorrect? Or could it be that one past perfect tense is enough and don't need to follow up with a second past perfect tense? ( I am not sure whether i wrote my question correctly to reflect what I wanted to say, though.)

Joe was happy. He had entered a contest the day before and (had?) won a medal. It's fine.

If you would like to discuss this further, please start a new thread.

Best wishes, Clive
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
CliveYet not so fast.

A reference from the classics

soon he slept the sleep of the just
Ah, well. Then there is no such thing as an exclusively intransitive verb or an exclusively transitive verb, I suppose. Too many special cases. Emotion: smile

CJ
Thank you guys.
I guess my example was a kind of exception because the object was not only implicit, but also non-specific.

In any case, checking Merriam Webster is always a good idea. Emotion: smile (There are virtually all the meanings, they give "slept the sleep of the dead" as an example of "sleep" used transitively).
Just to be a trouble-maker: I can think of contexts where all three of these examples make sense. 1. "We built the storage unit out of a new super-strong material. No matter how much weight you put on it, the shelf holds." 2. "There are two parts to the job: we must invent names for our products, and we must have these names approved by the lawyers. So we divided the work. The committee named; the legal department approved." 3. "He originally denied that he had brought drugs to school, but under intense questioning, the child broke."
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more