Hi, there,
Can anybody help me check if the following sentence is correct? Thanks a lot!
" In France, our tour guide introduced us to many delicious foods we'd never tried before."
Is it ok to change the above sentence to " In France, our tour guide introduced many delicious foods we'd never tried before to us."? Thanks again!
Hi, there, Can anybody help me check if the following sentence is correct? Thanks a lot! " In France, our ... sentence to " In France, our tour guide introduced many delicious foods we'd never tried before to us."? Thanks again!

That's the way people might talk, as they compose the sentence while speaking it. But when one has time to write it down, reread it, and write it right, I don't like it.
I don't like the phrase, "before to us", when the other version is perfectly clear. Sometimes both obvious choices are awkward, but your first choice here is fine.
s/ meirman
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" In France, our tour guide introduced us to many delicious foods we'd never tried before." Is it ok to change the above sentence to " In France, our tour guide introduced many delicious foods we'd never tried before to us."?

Not a good idea for two reasons:

1. Bad word order: the long phrase between "introduced" and"to us" is unidiomatic English.

2. Logic: the rewriitten sentence introduces the possibleimplication that the guide introduced foods
into France, besides that he introduced you to French food.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
" In France, our tour guide introduced us to many ... introduced many delicious foods we'd never tried before to us."?

Not a good idea for two reasons: 1. Bad word order: the long phrase between "introduced" and "to ... sentence introduces the possible implication that the guide introduced foods into France, besides that he introduced you to French food.

1. Don, I have a question.
2. I've been meaning to ask you this for some time.
3. Why do you enumerate everything?

Ross Howard
Not a good idea for two reasons: 1. ... into France, besides that he introduced you to French food.

1. Don, I have a question. 2. I've been meaning to ask you this for some time. 3. Why do you enumerate everything? Ross Howard

I also tend to structure my explanations in a similar way, for three reasons:

1 it makes the explanation clearer and
2 it avoids repetition.

tjb (with apologies to Monty Python).
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