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I am not sure whether this inversion sentence is right or not, if it is wrong. Would you give me a hand? Thank you for your help

1. Orignial sentence

Although human beings will benefit from the results of his research, these results certainly bring about a series of moral and ethic problems



2. Inversion sentence

Benefit as human beings will from the results of his research, these results certainly brings about a series of moral and ethic problems.
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Comments  
Hi,

I assume you are defining 'inversion' as 'placing the verb before the subject'.

1. Original sentence

Although human beings will benefit from the results of his research, these results certainly bring about a series of moral and ethic problems

2. Inversion sentence

Benefit as human beings will from the results of his research, these results certainly bring about a series of moral and ethic problems.

Seems fine to me, although you are inverting a clause rather than a sentence. If you want a simpler example where a whole sentence is inverted, consider this:

and we came the next day to Putiolus where we found brethren, and were desired to tarry with them seven days, and so came we to Rome. (from the New Testament, Book of Acts)

As you can see from this, you can take the simple sentence We came to Rome and invert it to Came we to Rome. However, it sounds very theatrical or poetical. I wouldn't suggest that you go around writing or speaking like that!

Inversion is still used in various situations in modern English, but is really only common in questions.

Best wishes, Clive
Clive1. Original sentence
Although human beings will benefit from the results of his research, these results certainly bring about a series of moral and ethic problems

2. Inversion sentence
Benefit as human beings will from the results of his research, these results certainly bring about a series of moral and ethic problems.

Seems fine to me,

Hello Clive

Are you sure that the questioner's sentence is fine to you? If it is OK, I think we can make a sentence like #2 to mean #1. Right?
(1.) Although they will make a lot of money, they cannot be happy.
(2.) Make as they will a lot of money, they cannot be happy.

paco
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I agree with Clive. This sentence seems ok to me. But I doubt people would use this tye of sentence structure in everyday use. What do you think if I use the following examples:

1) He is still a lonely man though he made a lot of money

2) Made a lot of money he did, though he is still a lonely man.

These two mean the same thing;don't you agree? If so, then, isn't # 2 constructed with the same inverted structure as the original question?
Goodman2) Made a lot of money he did, though he is still a lonely man.
Sorry, Goodman, but I have to say this sentence is ungrammatical. You cannot use two finite verbs (made and did) in a clause.

paco
Hi guys,

Paco, yes, you can do that, subject to our comments that it can sound archaic, poetic, uncommon, odd, awkward, etc.

We stil see inversion in certain common expressions. eg, from an Australian magazine article about a car test: try as he may, he could not keep his speed above 55 mph.

Clive
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Hi,

I think perhaps Goodman meant to write Make a lot of money he did, though he is still a lonely man.

Clive
I learned "try as someone may" as a fixed phrase. It is my first time to hear from a native speaker that we can generalize this sort of construct <inf. as S aux> to any combinations of an auxiliary verb and an infinitive verb.

paco
Hi,

Well, 'we can' doesn't mean 'we commonly do'. Let's not forget that this subject came up only in response to an exercise that Wang Chun specifically asked about.

Clive
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