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Dora ran as quickly as she could up the stairs.

Hi, I think the words in bold are an adverb clause because there is both a subject and a verb: 'she' and 'could' respectively.

However, wikipedia uses this sentence as an example of an adverb phrase, not an adverb clause.

1)Which one do you think it is?

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Also, I have asked a similar question before, but I never got a final answer:

'For those who have not heard of this place, it is right around the corner.'

Also, 'From this point on, I will lead by example.'

The italicised words are prepositional phrases; that much I do know. However, a prepositional phrase always acts as a noun, adjective, or adverb.

2)So are these prepositional phrases acting adverbally, adjectivally, or as nouns?

Thanks in advance.
Comments  
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1-- The BBC says:
  • He came as quickly as he could.
This structure is used to measure and compare things that are of similar proportion. In this construction, the first as functions as an adverb modifying the following adjective or adverb. The second as functions as a preposition when it relates to the following noun or pronoun. (It can also function as a conjunction when it relates to the following clause.)

2-- Sentence adverbs.
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Sentence adverbs...of course...thanks!

And is the first sentence you analysed therefore a comparative clause?

And so is it a clause or phrase? Why?

Thanks.
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there is both a subject and a verb: 'she' and 'could' respectively.
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So Wikipedia has made a mistake then.
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That is a good possibility-- Wikipedia is not the most reliable of resources. Or the writer may be considering the whole of 'as quickly as she could', while the BBC is analysing 'as she could' and the first comparative 'as' structure separately.
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'as quickly as she could'

Wouldn't it still be a clause? Comparative clause..

Also, I noticed you placed the comma outside the marks. 'as quickly as she could',

I thought a comma and period was always placed inside speech marks and marks around words such as these...
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Wouldn't it still be a clause?-- Different grammarians have different approaches.

Also, I noticed you placed the comma outside the marks. 'as quickly as she could', I thought a comma and period was always placed inside speech marks and marks around words such as these-- Personal preference-- I like punctuation that is sensible.
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Thanks.

I also have a sentence I'd like to see if I analysed correcctly.

If you could answer it, that would be great. But if you wish not to, that is fine.

http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/HardSentenceAnalysis/hxpxc/post.htm

Cheers.
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