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Could anybody correct the two sentences and my ideas of "be going to"for me?

This form can only been used in near future, indended action and something that must happen.
(1)Teacher: Tonight, we are going to talk about "Participial Adjectives"
Before the teacher said this, the students didn't know what they would dicuss that night. So the students must not intend to talk about"Participial Adjectives" So I think it's incorrect to use it there.

(2)I am going to take up English in a British university two years later.
In my opinion, I shouldn't use "am going to" because it's not belong to near future . but I don't know what is the best tense to be used here.
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Comments  
Hello Ong,

I really don't know the very strict rules about the tenses and your first sentence doesn't seem incorrect to me. To use "going to", you don't have to inform someone else beforehand. Yes, there is an intended action but this may be the program of the teacher.

To illsutrate more, errrm, think that a teacher comes into the classroom and before the lesson she says :"today we are going to learn the future tense". The students doesn't know anything but there is an intended action which will happen in near future.Emotion: geeked The more I think deeper, the more confused I feel. Anyway.

As for the second sentence.

" I am plannig to take up English..." and "I will take up Englsh..." can be used instead of the second sentence.
Hi Vctory Ong,

In your first example, the teacher has already made a decision about the topic to be covered in class. Thus, a discussion of "Participial Adjectives" is the teacher's intention. Since the teacher is the person who is in control of the content of the lesson, it may be viewed as being inevitable that the students "must" discuss the topic that the teacher intends to discuss.
Emotion: wink

In your second example, the choice of "be going to" suggests that the speaker views his/her future study as already decided. The fact that the sentence includes specific detail about "when" suggests that the person has decided on a plan of action. The word "will" would be more likely if the time were less specific. For example:

I will probably take up English in a British university a few years later.
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Hi,

The 'future with going to' is commonly introduced to students by saying that we use this when the speaker is talking about his 'plan'.

eg Carrying a gun, Tom walks into a room and says to Fred, 'I'm going to kill you'. It doesn't matter that Fred didn't already know about this. It's Tom's plan, not Fred's.

Best wishes, Clive
he is going to kill her.
"he" is used and he intend to kill her. So I use is going to.
The subject of the sentence intend to do.

We are going to talk about "Participial Adjectives'.
"we" is used but the students doesn't intend to talk about "Participial Adjectives"

The subject of the sentence doesn't intend to do that.
How can I use "be going to"?
This is just what I confused me.
Hi,

The police officer arrests Tom for murdering Fred.

He tells Tom, 'We are going to drive to the police station'.

Tom doesn't want to go. But the police officer is telling Tom, 'That's my plan. My plan involves both you and me'.

It's the same when the teacher talks to the students.

ie 'That's my plan. My plan involves both you and me'.

Best wishes, Clive
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Let me confirm again! As I am afraid that I may misunderstand your reply.

I will probably take up English in a British university a few years later.

I am going to take up English in a British university two years later.

I have used the best tenses in these two sentences
Victory Ong
Many Thanks in Advance
Let me confirm again! As I am afraid that I may misunderstand your reply. I will probably take up English in a British university a few years later. I am going to take up English in a British university two years later. I have used the best tenses in these two sentences Victory Ong Many Thanks in Advance
Hi,

Sounds fine.

Finally, however, note that the line between 'will' and 'be going to' is not always very clear. Sometimes, either can be used. Are you OK with this, or so you need some examples?

Best wishes, Clive
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