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Is American English dialect of British English?

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I would say that the American English dialects and the British English dialects form two "super-dialects" (or varieties) of the same language: English.

CJ

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This is a bit of a myth.

There was never a single British accent for American to be 'nearer' to. The short a sound still features in a lot of English accents. Less than 5% of British people speak RP.
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Comments  
Nope. They are independent varieties of the language.

The dialects cover smaller geographical areas.
Marius HancuNope. They are independent varieties of the language.

The dialects cover smaller geographical areas.
I like the term! Do linguists use it regularly?
According to Wikipedia, I was wrong: Emotion: embarrassed
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American English

American English (AmE, AE) is the dialect of the English language used
mostly in the United States of America.


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See also:
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British English


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Whatever ... however see the dialect table at the end of the link just above.
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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
Isn't it interesting that certain forms of American pronunciation aare older than the British ones? E.g., the short 'a' sound in "glass" and "pass" that the Americans use was the sound used in British English, till they changed it for the preferred long 'AH' sound.
Marius HancuAccording to Wikipedia, I was wrong: Emotion: embarrassed
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American English

American English (AmE, AE) is the dialect of the English language used
mostly in the United States of America.


--------

See also:
--------
British English


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Whatever ... however see the dialect table at the end of the link just above.

I still like your term. And, by the way: are we supposed to trust Wikipedia? I thought it was put together by lay persons and can be changed willy-nilly. I've never consulted it.
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I would say that the American English dialects and the British English dialects form two "super-dialects" (or varieties) of the same language: English.

CJ

This kind of sentences always bother me but today I have a chance to ask about this problem.

CJ said, ''...the American English dialects and the British English dialects...''

Shouldn't apostrophe be used here like, ''... the American English's dialects and the British English's dialects...''?
>> Isn't it interesting that certain forms of American pronunciation aare older than the British ones? E.g., the short 'a' sound in "glass" and "pass" that the Americans use was the sound used in British English, till they changed it for the preferred long 'AH' sound. <<

Yes, most varieties North American English preserve many archaic pronunciations that are no longer found in RP. That's one example, the another is the rhotic "r". However there are several innovations found in most varieties of NAE such as the merry-marry-Mary merger (so vary and very sound the same) bother-father merger (same vowel for both), the cot-caught merger, etc that are not found in RP. So, both General American English and RP are both a bit removed from the original English, however, General American is closer.
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