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Hello everybody Emotion: smile

All my best wishes for the new year !

Please can you tell me the difference between :

"Liz is bringing fudge over" and "Liz is bringing fudge"

"Some people do have leftover fudge" and "Some people have leftover fudge"

Thanks Emotion: smile
Comments  
Happy new year to you too, Rdep01

Adding "over" just shows that she's bringing it to where you are. If you and Liz were both attending a party being held somewhere else, you wouldn't say "over."

The "do" adds emphasis. Perhaps someone has expressed surprise that anyone would have leftover fudge (I know there wouldn't be any in MY house) so the person saying this is using the "do" to make the point more strongly.
Thank you ! Emotion: smile
Grammar GeekAdding "over" just shows that she's bringing it to where you are. If you and Liz were both attending a party being held somewhere else, you wouldn't say "over."
ok, there is an idea of "across" in "over"
Grammar GeekThe "do" adds emphasis. Perhaps someone has expressed surprise that anyone would have leftover fudge (I know there wouldn't be any in MY house) so the person saying this is using the "do" to make the point more strongly.
ok, like in "do give me this book"

By the way, is a "brownie" a kind of fudge with nuts ?
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No, there's no meaning of across. Your neighbor next door could bring something over.

A brownie is more of a cake - it will have flour and eggs. Fudge is pure candy. You can have nuts in either brownies or fudge. Fudge also comes in a variety of flavors - you can have vanilla, peanut butter, maple, even pistachio, but brownies are chocolate. (Blondies are "brownies" that are not chocolate. To me, they're just cookies baked in a square pan.) (And in case anyone ever bakes me brownies or makes me fudge, I think that nuts pollute the chocolate! Nuts are lovely in their own right, but please leave my chocolate pure and nut-free.)
Grammar GeekAdding "over" just shows that she's bringing it to where you are. If you and Liz were both attending a party being held somewhere else, you wouldn't say "over."
I mean, "over" doesn't mean "across", but there's a small idea of "across" in "over", like in Longman dictionary ?

Now, thanks to your answer, I think I understand. Thank you a lot !
Grammar GeekA brownie is more of a cake - it will have flour and eggs. Fudge is pure candy. You can have nuts in either brownies or fudge. Fudge also comes in a variety of flavors - you can have vanilla, peanut butter, maple, even pistachio, but brownies are chocolate. (Blondies are "brownies" that are not chocolate. To me, they're just cookies baked in a square pan.) (And in case anyone ever bakes me brownies or makes me fudge, I think that nuts pollute the chocolate! Nuts are lovely in their own right, but please leave my chocolate pure and nut-free.)
It's very clear. Now I know fudge ! Thank you ! Emotion: smile
And now I really want some fudge! Emotion: thinking
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Grammar GeekAnd now I really want some fudge! Emotion: thinking
Guess what I'm eating just now. Emotion: whisper

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