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Hi,

Is 'cent percent' used by native speakers?

I have heard few people using it to mean 100%, but later I was told that it is only used in Indian English link .

Kindly, tell me, it is a correct term for 100% or not.

Regards.
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Hi

Cent percent is used cent percent in my neck of the woods--I mean the term is very common in Pakistan.

Cent percent=100%

Tom
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"Cent percent" is not used by native speakers, so no.

It is understandable how it may have come into use, as the meaning of "percent" is "per 100" -
the "cent" part meaning "100". Thus, a direct but incorrect translation of "100 per 100" would be "cent percent", but native speakers never use "cent" to mean "100". (In the USA, "cent" is used most commonly and almost exclusively to mean "penny", the smallest denomination of coinage, meaning 1/100th of a dollar)
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Thomas_AndersonHi,

Is 'cent percent' used by native speakers?

"Cent. per cent." can be found in the works of English writers up to at least the early 20th century (I have seen it in Trollope, and also Joyce's "Ulysses").

I used to hear it quite often from older native speakers in City offices; but as the speakers have departed, so (it seems) has the phrase.

I'm not too surprised to hear that it's still current in India and Pakistan; much BrE commercialese has a home there.

All the best,

MrP

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This native speaker in the US has never seen it or heard it.
Me neither.
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Nor have I.
Thanks a lot Grammar Geek, khoff and Philip.
 Mr. Tom's reply was promoted to an answer.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
This reminds me of expressions such as "bed tea" and "melody songs". Emotion: smile
i.e. Expressions I'd never heard before, but which are apparently quite commonly used in "Indian English".
I still think "prepone" is the best Indian English word that we should all adopt. What is bed tea?
Hi Barb

Some of us learned about the fine art of "bed tea" from Tom here .
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