I have been preoccupied by the presidential election which had kept me away from the E. Forum. I am glad it's over!
I Woke up at 6 this morning and turned on CNN to catch the result, or the confirmation of the presidential election, It didn't surprise me; B.O. won by a large margin. Also, Proposition 8 (against gay marriage in Calif) was passing by 52 to 48 %. When it comes to moral and tradition, I believe the mature
population still hold the ground which let to the passing of prop 8.

On the other hand, B.O. beat the Republican presidential candidate, McCain, pretty convincingly; to a certain extent, even embarrassing to the Rep. party.

The reason was this in my opinion: . B.O. got 60-65 % of the younger voters between 18-35 who were mesmerized by B.O.'s charismatic speeches and were tired of the Bush's same old politics and inability to lead the country, and wanted changes.

B.O. couldn't have a weaker opponent to run against. McCain is too soft and his camp ran a terrible campaign. In fact, his concession speech was the best one and most heart-felt of all the ones I had heard. Now B.O. is our new president -elect. he is our new leader, I hope he is the light people are searching for and I sure hope he is not going ot make his doubters say "I told you so..." to his supporters. There are still shawdows lurking behind the man which make me cautious. For the nationa's sake, I hope I am wrong.

This election will have profound impacts to international communities. What do you think?
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Goodman18-35 who were mesmerized by B.O.'s charismatic speeches and were tired of the Bush's same old politics and inability to lead the country, and wanted changes.
I don't have any major disagreement with this. Although we might disagree on exactly what Bush's leadership failures are.
GoodmanB.O. couldn't have a weaker opponent to run against.
All too true. The only reason he did as well as he did is because he had an uncharacteristic flash of inspiration and chose Palin for VP.
GoodmanI hope he is the light people are searching for and I sure hope he is not going ot make his doubters say "I told you so..." to his supporters.
I am sure you will be disappointed in this wish.
GoodmanThere are still shawdows lurking behind the man which make me cautious. For the nationa's sake, I hope I am wrong.
Shadows? Cautious? I should say so. He is surrounded by the shadiest, most disreputable, unsavory, and unethical bunch of associates and allies who have ever been found lurking around a newly elected US president. At the risk of quoting Obi-Wan Kenobi "You will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy. We must be cautious."

Sadly, you are not wrong. We can only hope the Republican party gets its act together and finds a way to stop the worst of the policies and laws that Obama and the congress (also a "wretched hive of scum and villainy") under Reid, and Pelosi will try to implement.
I don't think we're in trouble, but I think it would behoove us as Americans to watch this overwhelming leftist majority with a very close eye.

Obama is a symbol of many great things this country stands for. Let's just hope he lives up to the ideals he ran on. Any time this nation has one party in charge of both houses and the executive branch, it's bad.
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Hi all
In case anyone is interested in a Finnish television reporter's views about the outcome of the election, he thought McCain's defeat can in part be attributed to his choosing Sarah Palin as his vice presidential candidate. To the reporter's mind, Palin is ultraconservative and consequently didn't appeal to undecided voters who were between the Democrats and the Republicans politically.
I know little about Sarah Palin's opinions and so I can't say whether I agree with the reporter or not. I must say I was shocked when I read her [url=http://www.englishforums.com/English/SarahPalinInvolvementNegotiations/gxvhx/post.htm ] answer [/url] to a question she was asked by the CNN. If I were president of the USA and she were vice president, I would think it extremely embarrassing to introduce her to foreign heads of state and diplomats.
A president's campaign promises and eloquent speeches will do little to ease the worldwide economic crisis, which will probably be seen in a year or two. Hopefully the poor in America will fare a little better in the next four years. There are millions of Americans who have no health insurance, for example, and the USA would have a politically more stable future if the basic needs of people were attended to.
I do wish Obama luck, for selfish reasons to an extent: if the USA suffers, the western world suffers as well.
CB
Cool BreezeIf I were president of the USA and she were vice president, I would think it extremely embarrassing to introduce her to foreign heads of state and diplomats.
Ridiculous. Sarah Palin was subjected to a savage and non-stop smear campaign from the moment she was named as VP. Nobody's life, opinions, and knowledge could withstand such an attack. Not you, not me, nobody.

Palin is the only reason McCain wasn't blown out of any chance of wining in early September. She energized Republican voters to a dregree that McCain couldn't even dream of doing on the best day of his life.

A Finnish television reporter? You've got to be kidding. Very few Americans belive what US reporters have to say, we certainly don't believe what Finnish reporters have to say, not about something as culturally specific to America as an election campaign anyway.
shavedObama is a symbol of many great things this country stands for.
Such as?
shavedLet's just hope he lives up to the ideals he ran on
What might those ideals be? I don't remember any. Well, there was the "redistribution of wealth" ideal. Is that what you mean? Or maybe you mean the "surrender to the terrorists" ideal. Or how about the "appeasement of rogue dictators" ideal. Appeasement always works so well, after all. Could that be ideal you are talking about?
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RayHA Finnish television reporter? You've got to be kidding. Very few Americans belive what US reporters have to say, we certainly don't believe what Finnish reporters have to say, not about something as culturally specific to America as an election campaign anyway.

You have misunderstood me completely. Reporters express opinions as well as facts in their accounts. Opinions are not laid out to be believed. How could they all be true as there are lots of journalists with varying opinions? I just mentioned one opinion, not a fact, for forum members to ponder.
I have not followed the US election campaigns closely enough to be familiar with details. I had never heard of Sarah Palin until one day I read a translation of her reply to a CNN reporter's question in Helsingin Sanomat, Scandinavia's biggest newspaper. As her reply made no sense and had nothing to do with the question, I was prompted to find out what had actually been said in English and whether she really was the kind of dingbat her reply suggested. There's a link to the question and reply in my previous post.
More opinions, not facts to be believed, in the same newspaper about Barack Obama:
The election of Barack Obama for the 44th US president is a memorable event in the history of a powerful but suffering democracy. It marks the conclusion of eight years of endless mistakes made by George W Bush.
One cannot help feeling sorry for Obama when one sees the mountain of problems he is facing.
...
Obama is no saint. He has proved that he can "forget" what he has said and stretch his principles. He is even capable of lying although his campaign pales in comparison with the smear campaign of the John McCain group.
Replies from all over the world to what will change after Obama assumes office: (Real names withheld by me)
Man, 39, Beijing, China: "I hope Obama can solve the economic crisis in a way that will minimize its effects on China's economy."
Woman, 31, Moscow, Russia: "I read in a newspaper that if McCain wins, the dollar will tumble in January. If Obama wins, the dollar will tumble in March."
Man, 60, Istanbul, Turkey: "It is great that Obama was elected and we'll get rid of Bush. America has become our neighbor in Iraq. It's time they left!"
Man, 19, Kuopio, Finland: "I believe that there will be an economic boom. The relations between the USA and Russia will improve."
Woman, 24, Tallinn, Estonia: "I'm very pleased. A black US president will make people more tolerant."
Woman, 69, Potsdam, NY, USA: "The choice matters for Europe too because in my opinion he thinks as many Europeans do."
Man, 35, Paris, France: "It's very surprising that skin color wasn't a factor after all. Obama wasn't elected solely by Afro-Americans."
Woman, 48, Swindon, Great Britain: "Great! I believe that Obama's victory can truly change terrorists' opinions and make the world a safer place."
- Helsingin Sanomat, November 6, 2008
CB
Cool BreezeYou have misunderstood me completely. Reporters express opinions as well as facts in their accounts. Opinions are not laid out to be believed. How could they all be true as there are lots of journalists with varying opinions? I just mentioned one opinion, not a fact, for forum members to ponder.
My comment was more about reporters than it was about what you said. I know that in some countries and cultures reporters are expected to insert their opinions into their "reporting" but in the U. S. reporters (they like to call themselves by the pompous term "journalist") go to great lengths to claim to be entirely objective and unbiased in their reporting.

Everyone who pays any attention knows that this claim is a bald faced lie. In the election just past the bias in favor of Obama and against Palin was so complete and obvious that even the reporters themselves started commenting on it. Hence my comment about believing reporters, especially reporters who present their opinions (either overtly or covertly) in what purports to be a news story.
Ray,

On the night of the election, I knew by 7 pm Calif time, we as a country, were to face uncertain future worst than the one we currently have with Bush. I believe we are on the same page as far as our political views are concerned. Now that we have a democratically controlled House of rep. and Senate to support a new president –elect; who by the way has an Islamic name. I couldn’t help but wonder. I know a lot of people cheered for this historical day because United State finally elected a minority president who was practically unknown on the national level. Nancy Polosi, Harry Reeds, Barbara Boxer and the liberal scum couldn’t have been happier and they were gloating after the victory was declared. These are the people who wanted the United States to convert to international laws and change to the European socialist government. Now with B.O. in the White House, there will encounter little resistance. God help us!
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