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I hear someone said "long time no see" is Chinese origin but now is widely used in English-speaking countries.
Is it true?
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I always thought it was a cruel imitation of the English pidgin of the Native American of 200 years ago, Jobb.
I think so.

This is a literal translation of "ho noi mou gin" (Cantonese).
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I am not sure which opinion is more acceptable.
Me neither, Jobb.
ho - very
noi - long time
mou - no
gin - see

That said, I may very well be wrong about the origin of the phrase.
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My dictionary (OED) says it comes from an imitative speech of an native American. The oldest use in literature was recorded in 1901 in "31 Years on Plain" by W. F. Drannan. When we rode up to him (an American Indian), he said: "Good mornin. Long time no see you".

paco
Really! Well, I can't wait to tell my Chinese friends about this. They will be "nicely" surprised!

Thanks!

Edited to add:

Even some online dictionaries got it wrong.

Look at dictionary.com:
long time no see

It's been a long time since we met, as in Hi Bob! Long time no see. This jocular imitation of broken English originated in the pidgin English used in Chinese and Western exchange. [Late 1800s]

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hehehehe...I've just become a full member.
long time no see

It's been a long time since we met, as in Hi Bob! Long time no see. This jocular imitation of broken English originated in the pidgin English used in Chinese and Western exchange. [Late 1800s]

based on this page:

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/long%20time%20no%20see
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