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Is it compulsory to use articles, ''a'', an, and the, with only countable nouns? If what I'm saying is true then what is the reason for such a compulsion? And does it also mean no matter wherever a countable noun comes in a sentence you have to use a article with it?
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Jackson6612Is it compulsory to use articles, a, an, and the, with only countable nouns?
Only "a" and "an" are restricted to countable nouns.
Jackson6612 If what I'm saying is true then what is the reason for such a compulsion?
For example, their origin ("a" and "an" stands for "one").
Jackson6612And does it also mean no matter wherever a countable noun comes in a sentence you have to use a article with it?
No. This is a very general question actually. Try posting some sentences the use of articles wherein you don't understand...
Ant_222
Jackson6612Is it compulsory to use articles, a, an, and the, with only countable nouns?
Only "a" and "an" are restricted to countable nouns.
Jackson6612 If what I'm saying is true then what is the reason for such a compulsion?
For example, their origin ("a" and "an" stands for "one").
Jackson6612And does it also mean no matter wherever a countable noun comes in a sentence you have to use a article with it?
No. This is a very general question actually. Try posting some sentences the use of articles wherein you don't understand...

This is a apple. You mean a apple means one apple. So that means I cannot write: This is a one apple. Because such sentence will be redundant.
Question 1: Am I correct?

I have eaten only a single apple. Here single also means one but I think it's a correct sentence.
Question 2: Why is so?

I couldn't come up with any example sentences right now. Please it will be very kind of you if you can provide some sentences yourself.

Best wishes,
Jackson
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Jackson6612This is a apple. You mean a apple means one apple. So that means I cannot write: This is a one apple. Because such sentence will be redundant.
Question 1: Am I correct?
Yes. And it should be "an apple".

Jackson6612I have eaten only a single apple. Here single also means one but I think it's a correct sentence.
Question 2: Why is so?
"Single" is just an adjective and does not posess the power of replacing articles. Such is English grammar: adjecives, whatever they mean, do not interfere with articles. In your example "single" serves as an amphasis (the sentence would still be OK without it), which explains the redundancy. The adjectives "great big" and "tiny little" also use redundancy to emphasize their effect. It is the only explanation I can think of.
Jackson6612I couldn't come up with any example sentences right now. Please it will be very kind of you if you can provide some sentences yourself.
Well, I don't know what you don't know. So show me what it is.
This may be too much information, but we do use articles with abstract, non-count nouns to say what type.

He experienced a happiness never before experienced by man. (What sort of happiness? One that was never experienced before.)

She experienced the ecstacy that comes to those who have worked hard to obtain their dreams and see them realized. (What type of ecstacy? The type that...)

You would not say "He had a happiness" or "She experienced an ecstacy," however. These work only because of the additional information saying what sort.

Did that make things worse?
GG, your post is just to the point. It's just that I do consider such nouns countable when they're used the way you showed. The very specifying of special properties makes these nouns refer to an instance of happiness or ecstasy, thus making them countable. What I wanted to say is, whenever the indefinite article is used, the following noun is either countable or plays a "countable" role.
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Ant_222GG, your post is just to the point. It's just that I do consider such nouns countable when they're used the way you showed. The very specifying of special properties makes these nouns refer to an instance of happiness or ecstasy, thus making them countable. What I wanted to say is, whenever the indefinite article is used, the following noun is either countable or plays a "countable" role.

Ant, you mean that even article the is used with countable nouns or the nouns which are acting as countable nouns. And would you please give a short explanation of the underlined part. Thank you.
Jackson6612Ant, you mean that even article the is used with countable nouns or the nouns which are acting as countable nouns.
Yes, but it can be used with uncountable nouns as well. Countable (along the lines of GG's example): "The happiness that he had now was something he had never experiences before".

Uncountable: "Boil a litre of water, put 25 g of tea into an eathenware pot, pour the water onto the tea".
Jackson6612And would you please give a short explanation of the underlined part
When you specify the properties of something referred to by a noun that usually has an abstract, categorical or very general meaning, that automatically changes the meaning of it so that it denotes a specific instance of that general category. For example, in GG's sentence, instead of the general happiness you have a specific happiness, experienced by a specific person.
Grammar GeekShe experienced the ecstacy that comes to those who have worked hard to obtain their dreams and seem the realized.
What does this "seem the realized" part mean? Either I don't understand it or you have made a mistake Emotion: wink
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