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I'm having a debate with a friend, our English teacher said that it was 'an' but apparently a grammar book my friend read said that it was definitely 'a'

oh help me english forums in my hour of need
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A history.

I've never heard of "an history" before....
A long time ago, in the 19th century, some people sometimes used an before some words that began with "h". I don't think such usage is possible in modern English.

CB
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
An hour, an honest man etc (when the h sound is silent)
AnonymousI'm having a debate with a friend, our English teacher said that it was 'an' but apparently a grammar book my friend read said that it was definitely 'a'
oh help me english forums in my hour of need

The first syllable of history is stressed, so a is used. However, some people still cling to an older style in which words like historic (first syllable not stressed) take an.

a history. (both older and newer styles)

an historical novel. (older style)

a historical novel. (newer style)

CJ
CalifJimHowever, some people still cling to an older style in which words like historic (first syllable not stressed) take an.
I'm one of those "clingers". (A Klingon?) Emotion: big smile But it's not actually something I do consciously. That's just the way I've always spoken. For a long time I didn't even realize I did it. An ESL student of mine once asked me why I'd just said "an historical event", and that's when I first realized that I actually used "an" with those sorts of H-words.

I say "a history book", but "an historical novel".

It's only a very slight N, but there's an N sound there nonetheless.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
YankeeI'm one of those "clingers".
Sometimes I am too. I vacillate between the two. On any given day I can't even guess whether an or a is going to come out before historical or hysterical. Fortunately, I don't use either one very often. Emotion: smile

CJ