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A person is not judged by their knowledge nor wealth. It's by his emotional intelligence!


Does "It" mean a person?

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KeunChulLeeDoes "It" mean a person?

No, it refers to "judgement."
He is judged by his emotional intelligence.

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KeunChulLee

A person is not judged by their knowledge nor wealth. It's by his emotional intelligence!

Does "It" mean a person?

No, "It" here refers to "judgement". The sentence is rather disorganized and inconsistent. The writer should have said something like:

A person is not judged by their knowledge nor wealth. They are judged by their emotional intelligence.

A person is not judged by their knowledge nor wealth, but by their emotional intelligence.

A person is not judged by their knowledge nor wealth. It's done by their emotional intelligence (this one's a bit awkward, but not as bad as the original).

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Comments  

judgment

CJ

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CalifJimjudgment

I took it for granted that judgement is fully acceptable. If it had not been for your reply, I couldn't notice the right spelling. Thank you.

KeunChulLeeI took it for granted that judgement is fully acceptable.

It is acceptable as a typical alternate spelling as far as I know. I was just being a noodge. Emotion: smile Here's why:

As it turns out, when I was in grade school (a thousand years ago), I was eliminated in a spelling bee for spelling it "judgement", and I was one of just three students left. That variant spelling was not accepted.

It is really for this reason that I have had a lifelong traumatic relationship with the spelling of "judgment" (or "judgement"). Emotion: big smile

CJ

According to Merriam Webster: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/judgment


Judgment can also be spelled "judgement," and usage experts have long disagreed over which spelling is the preferred one. Henry Fowler asserted, "The OED [Oxford English Dictionary] prefers the older and more reasonable spelling. 'Judgement' is therefore here recommended." William Safire held an opposite opinion, writing, "My judgment is that Fowler is not to be followed." "Judgement" is in fact the older spelling, but it dropped from favor and for centuries "judgment" was the only spelling to appear in dictionaries. That changed when the OED (Fowler's source) was published showing "judgement" as an equal variant. Today, "judgment" is more popular in the U.S., whereas both spellings make a good showing in Britain.

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