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I'm curious to find out if it is grammatically correct to use words off of together, for exemple: " He got scared and fell off of the aircraft." I'm sure Americans use it, but does the British people use it? Thank you.

-strazdins
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Comments  (Page 2) 
I am from England and I recall my English teacher being very emphatic that the use of "off of" was not acceptable. For instance, if we look at the sentence "Take that book off the table." You can take a book off the table which means you remove it from the table, however if we look at the sentence "he is the son of his father", here the use of "of' is usually used to separate two nouns indicating one belongs to the other. If we go back to the first sentence, the use of "of" after "off" makes no sense. The book does not belong to the table. Hope this helps. Unfortunately, in our schools today, there is not the emphasis on the use of good grammar as it was when I was a boy - and that was 80 years ago.
Deric.
Out of the window is just as incorrect as off of! We do in fact say out the window.
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AnonymousOut of the window is just as incorrect as off of!
What gave you that strange idea? '... out of the window' is fine.
In Britain we would say inside the box, rather than inside of the box. Outside the house, rather than outside of the house. I think people have tended not to use off of here simply because it does not roll well off the tongue, it's also somewhat surplus to requirements.
Anonymousit's also somewhat surplus to requirements.
It is not "somewhat". It is unnecessary. The word "of", adds no extra meaning. Saying "off of" seems to be something that is mainly done by speakers of American English.
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AnonymousSaying "off of" seems to be something that is mainly done by speakers of American English.
I have heard it from quite a few speakers of BrE.
AnonymousSaying "off of" seems to be something that is mainly done by speakers of American English.
"Mainly", perhaps, but it is not unheard of in other parts of the world.

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CJ
sorry, it is never correct. You don't modify an adverb with a preposition
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If you use 'off of' to get 'off of your horse' - can you get 'on of your horse' ?

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