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Hope you don't mind just one more question. Is there a difference in intended meaning in the following?

Betty crammed the car with her children.

Betty crammed her children into the car.
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Hi,

They're both OK. The second would be heard more often.

Betty crammed the car with her children.The focus here is on the car. For example, it might be the answer to the question 'Why did Betty have a car accident?'

Betty crammed her children into the car. The focus here is on the children. eg Why are Betty's children crying?

Best wishes, Clive
<Hope you don't mind just one more question. Is there a difference in intended meaning in the following?

Betty crammed the car with her children.

Betty crammed her children into the car.>

To me, the first one says that Betty filled the car with her children and so there was no, or little, space for anything else. The second says that the car was quite full before she put the kids in and so she had to cram the kids in among the other things.
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The first sentence leaves me with the impression that Betty had a lot of children - enough to cram a whole car full of them. The second sentence does not leave that impression. In the second case, Betty need have only two children, but they probably felt uncomfortable in those cramped quarters. However, I don't think the second says the car was already somewhat full; it may have been a very small car where even just two children would have felt crammed in.
CJ
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Spray
The second sentence is a common phrase...to cram my children into the car. The children would be crammed because the space inside the car is very small comapred to the space the children takes up to feel comfortable.

The first sentence, while grammatically correct, is not often used. Why would I cram my car using my children as the cramming material?

Let's look at another case:

Betty crammed the Thanksgiving turkey with her stuffing.
Betty crammed her stuffing into the Thankgiving turkey.

In this case, I think both have pretty much the same meaning.
<The first sentence, while grammatically correct, is not often used. Why would I cram my car using my children as the cramming material?>

It is used, a good sentence, and quite graphic.

E.G.

"We invited Betty, our workmate, to come with us on the picnic. Little did we know she would cram the car with children. We thought she would have left at least two of them with her mother."

The original sentences have individual meanings, as was shown above.
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Exactly as I suspected.

This is kind of tongue-in-cheek expression to make fun of Betty who apparently has many, many children and worse yet, she takes all of them wherever she goes.

So this sentence is making fun of Betty...it's supposed to be humorous..."cram the car with children"...she has so many children to go around...many extras...see the picture?