Do the words "Titties" and "boobies" mean the same thing? Or do they have different meanings?
I'd be more interested to know your gut feeling when you've just read the question, rather than your considered opinion. To me it is important that I know how you feel before you read anyone else's answer. (Bad form I know, not reading the thread before you reply.)
For a bit of background:-
I got involved in a conversation on

It started with a person mentioning the distress they felt at people mispronouncing the main characters name.
Other people said 'Don't wory about it', then someone asked if Orcs would be as scary if they were called fluffies.
This woman...

said "Words and sounds don't have associations inherently . They have associations because human beings attribute them."

Which made me think of Professor Ramachandran's Reith lectures.

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Do the words "Titties" and "boobies" mean the same thing? Or do they have different meanings?

Same. Not even a nuance of difference.
I'd be more interested to know your gut feeling when you've just read the question, rather than your considered opinion. ... how you feel before you read anyone else's answer. (Bad form I know, not reading the thread before you reply.)

Even on considered reflection..same.
On Mother's Day (US), Tony Cooper wrote, in part:
Do the words "Titties" and "boobies" mean the same thing? Or do they have different meanings?

Same. Not even a nuance of difference.

Maybe I'm wrong, but to me, 'tit' refers to the nipple, whereas 'boob' refers to the breast. (I'm not likely to use either word, though, in practice, and certainly not 'titties' or 'boobies'.)

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Do the words "Titties" and "boobies" mean the same thing? Or do they have different meanings?

Same meaning, different user group - that is my gut feeling.

Er, I mean user group for the expression, not the... oh well, never mind.
I'd be more interested to know your gut feeling when you've just read the question, rather than your considered opinion. ... fluffies. said "Words and sounds don't have associations inherently . They have associations because human beings attribute them."

Sounds quite Shakespearian to me:
"'Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What's Montague? it is nor hand, nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O, be some other name!
What's in a name? that which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet;
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call'd,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title."
(Romeo and Juliet, Act II Scene ii)
I have never been entirely convinced by the above, in that our interpretation of sensory inputs is influenced by prior knowledge. Give a woman a bunch of roses, but as you do, tell her that although they look like roses, they are in fact a related but unpleasant relative, commonly known as "Hippopotamus Rectum" because of the smell that begins to develop after thirty minutes out of water. See if she considers them to "smell as sweet".
This experiment, I concede, does not directly address the claim that words and sounds have associations because we attribute them rather than inherently. Then again, such a claim is somewhat ridiculous - "associate" being defined at M-W Online (http://tinyurl.com/ywokx ) as: "to bring together or into relationship in any of various intangible ways (as in memory or imagination)" and "attribute" as "to regard as a characteristic of a person or thing" (http://tinyurl.com/hjo6 ). The woman concerned is really stating the bleeding obvious, when you take the time to examine her semantics. It could be paraphrased as:
"Words and sounds are only related to one another in our imagination because we imagine them to be so."

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Same. Not even a nuance of difference.

Maybe I'm wrong, but to me, 'tit' refers to the nipple,

Perhaps on animals, but not humans.
(snip)
(I've noted your comments, and will be commenting upon them soonish.)
Other people said 'Don't wory about it', then someone asked if Orcs would be as scary if they were called fluffies.

said "Words and sounds don't have associations inherently . They have associations because human beings attribute them."

(snip)
This experiment, I concede, does not directly address the claim that words and sounds have associations because we attribute them ... as: "Words and sounds are only related to one another in our imagination because we imagine them to be so."

http://groups.google.co.uk/groups?selm=15gf0znpqa8np%24.18gg41cqj4dg%24.dlg%4040tude.net

"I believe that there is evidence that some phonosemantic associations are found cross-linguistically in unrelated languages."

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Do the words "Titties" and "boobies" mean the same thing? Or do they have different meanings?

Of course they have different meanings.
are usually called, in America, chickadees. I assume titties are pet ***. Boobies can't be domesticated because they aren't smart enough. I would have thought the same thing about chickadees, but I have seen a cardinal eat out of a person's hand, so maybe that counts as close enough for petting purposes. So maybe *** can be petted. Boobies are apparently tasty enough, especially if you are on the verge of starvation. are too small to eat, although with recipes for larks' tongues, who knows what people might think up.
Jon Miller
Do the words "Titties" and "boobies" mean the same thing? Or do they have different meanings?

Same. Not even a nuance of difference.

I think there is. I wouldn't be particularly surprised to hear a woman refer jocularly to my boobies among acquaintances, but I doubt she'd say "my titties" except among close friends.

Ross Howard
Jonathan Miller filted:
I have seen a cardinal eat out of a person's hand, so maybe that counts as close enough for petting purposes.

I am never going to understand how this communion thing works..r
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