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Dear all,

I would like to know which of the following sentences are correct. I have written beside each sentence what I know about them.

1) My license is expired. (State. Here "expired" is an adjective.)

2) My license was expired. ( I would like to know whether this sentence can be considered as "state" in past tense.)

3) My license has expired. ( I think that this sentence is correct.).

4) My license expired. (I think that this sentence is correct.)

Thank you.

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cat navy 425

1) My license is expired. (State. Here "expired" is an adjective.) OK. Right.

2) My license was expired. ( I would like to know whether this sentence can be considered as "state" in past tense.)
OK. Yes. It's the same as 1), but in the past.

3) My license has expired. ( I think that this sentence is correct.). Correct. Present perfect. No time implied about when this happened.

— Why don't you drive us to the movies tonight?
— I can't. My license has expired.

4) My license expired. (I think that this sentence is correct.) Correct. Simple past. Time implied if not stated.
— Why are you studying that driver's manual?
— My license expired last month, so I have to take a test to get it renewed.

CJ

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The best way to express these, in my opinion, is to use the verb rather than the adjective. Thus, you can say:

1. My license expired. (past event)
2. My license has expired. (past event implying present state)
3. My license had expired. (past event implying past state)

The sentences "My license is expired" (describing present state; alternative to 2) and "My license was expired" (describing past state; alternative to 3) may be used, but are slightly inferior, in my opinion.

(Cross-posted.)

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Thanks a lot CJ Sir.
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Thanks a lot sir.
CJ Sir, I would like to ask you one question here. A couple of days back I sent one bill to my superior to get it processed. But he returned it with a note "this bill was expired. So it cannot be processed." But now I feel that the correct usage for that context are 1) This bill expired on 15/04/2020. So it can't be processed. 2) This bill has expired. So it can't be processed. But I think that "was expired" is possible in the following context.

3) When I went through the bill I found that the bill was expired on 15/04/2020.

Kindly give your valuable opinion on this.


Thank you.

Hmm. I am familiar with a license expiring, but I've never heard it said of a bill. But I'll answer on the assumption that expired bills are something that you might deal with where you work.

cat navy 425A couple of days back I sent one a bill to my superior to get it processed, but he returned it with a note "this bill was expired. So it cannot be processed."

Is your superior a native speaker of English? I ask because that doesn't sound like something a native speaker would say.

cat navy 425But now I feel that the correct usage for that context are
1) This bill expired on 15/04/2020, so it can't be processed.
2) This bill has expired, so it can't be processed.

Yes. Those are both good choices.

cat navy 425But I think that "was expired" is possible in the following context.

3) When I went through the bill I found that the bill was expired on 15/04/2020.

That is understandable as you wrote it, but an English speaker would say "had" instead of "was".

CJ

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CJ Sir, my superior is not a native speaker of English. He is a native of Kerala in India. Thanks a lot for this valuable information.