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Is the foIlowing sentence correct?

1: I was at mistake.

Most probably it's a correct sentence, but why couldn't on be used in stead of at?
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Jackson6612Is the foIlowing sentence correct?

1: I was at mistake.

Most probably it's a correct sentence, but why couldn't on be used in stead of at? I wouldn't use either one.

I was mistaken.
If you did say "I was at mistake", although it is grammatically incorrect and sounds quite strange, you would probably be understood. If you changed the "at" to an "on", however, I don't think any English speaker would have a clue as to what you meant. The person you were talking to would just say "huh?".
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Philip and Marvin, thank you very much for helping me. Suggestions are still welcome.
Of course 'I was at mistake' is wrong whether or not anyone understands you; if we go that way then there's no need for forums such as these.

Sounds to me like there's a confusion between:

I was mistaken (as pointed out in a previous post)

and

I was at fault.

Both are more formal alternatives to the usual spoken expression, which of course is... I was wrong.
Tam SadekOf course 'I was at mistake' is wrong whether or not anyone understands you; if we go that way then there's no need for forums such as these.

Sounds to me like there's a confusion between:

I was mistaken (as pointed out in a previous post)

and

I was at fault.

Both are more formal alternatives to the usual spoken expression, which of course is... I was wrong.

Hi Tam Sadek,

I think my mind was confusing I was at fault with I was at mistake, therefore I got confused and went on to ask about I was at mistake. Thank you for your help. Suggestions are still welcome.
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No worries Jackson. Errors are often due to mixing up two expressions which have a similar meaning. One thing to note here is the use of the preposition:

I was at fault.

and as an extension; another similar expression, but using a different preposition:

I was to blame.
Tam SadekNo worries Jackson. Errors are often due to mixing up two expressions which have a similar meaning. One thing to note here is the use of the preposition:

I was at fault.

and as an extension; another similar expression, but using a different preposition:

I was to blame.

Hi Tam Sadek,

Thank you for helping me. I hope you will always be there to help me. Suggestions are still welcome.

Best wishes, Jackson