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The word is "clever."

The word is "clever".

Which is the correct way to punctuate the above sentence? Do the British and the Americans punctuate differently with regard to the above?
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Comments  (Page 4) 
The word "quotes" is regularly used (and understood by most) to refer to quotation marks (noun) OR to a remark or statement that a person has made (noun) OR when using as a verb.

You can see this for yourself in the Oxford English Dictionary - http://www.askoxford.com/concise_oed/quote?view=uk

I would hope all language teachers embrace the primary purpose of any language, encluding English, which is communication.

Naturally, languages evolve continously as our world changes. And I hope our teaching communities are not encouraging us to become stuck in our ways, or surely we are at risk of strangling the development and evolution of the next generation. After all, it is their world too. And will be their world long after we are gone.

Chris
Yoong Liat is "clever."
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The simplest way to explain this is as follows. If you are quoting a whole sentence, then the full stop goes before the quotation marks. For example:

"Hello there."

However, if you have a quote and non-quote together in a sentence, then the full stop goes after the quotation marks. For example:

The word is "clever".

In this example, you can see that the sentence started off with ordinary description: "The word is". But after, I have included a quote: "clever". So because this is all in one sentence, I put the full stop after the quotation marks. In the first example however, there is only a quotation, there is not a description. So for this reason, the full stop goes inside the quotation marks.
I think this is exactly what J Lewis meant, only that it doesn't apply only to quoted word within a sentence, but also to a sentence quoted in full within a sentence.

So still J Lewis was right.
AnonymousThe simplest way to explain this is as follows. If you are quoting a whole sentence, then the full stop goes before the quotation marks. For example:
"Hello there."

However, if you have a quote and non-quote together in a sentence, then the full stop goes after the quotation marks. For example:
The word is "clever".

In this example, you can see that the sentence started off with ordinary description: "The word is". But after, I have included a quote: "clever". So because this is all in one sentence, I put the full stop after the quotation marks. In the first example however, there is only a quotation, there is not a description. So for this reason, the full stop goes inside the quotation marks.
Hi,

I agree. To cut the long story short: you have to follow the cited text: if a full stop belongs to the quote then put it inside the quotation marks; if the quote is without the period then put the full stop outside the quotation marks.
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I am with you on this one. It is logical and simple so why not, in informal writing why shouldn't we use your ' "American grammer?". '?
^ Witty Emotion: stick out tongue

Emotion: smile I think the first one
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after quotation
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