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Hi,

Please tell me what is the difference between these two forms of verb constructions?

is given or is being given

is discussed or is being discussed

Another questions:

1. Should I ask, "what is the difference?" or "what is a difference?"

2. Should I capitalize the sentences in parenthesis in question 1 like this?

Should I ask, "What is the difference?' or "What is a difference?"
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BelieverHi,

Please tell me what (is) the difference is between these two forms of verb constructions?

is given or is being given

is discussed or is being discussed
progressive and simple present tense in passive form


Another questions:

1. Should I ask, "what is the difference?" Yes

or "what is a difference?" No

2. Should I capitalize (the) sentences within (parenthes(i)es)quotation marks in questions like this? Yes, provided they are capitalized originally.

Evening Believer,

  1. Both is given/discussed and is being given/discussed are Passive voice, the difference being in that the first is Indefinite and the second Continuous/Progressive.
  2. I think "What's the difference?" is the only correct way to say it. Me, I can't figure out a situation where "What's a difference?" could be an option.


  3. A side remark: 'Please tell me what the difference... is...' It's not a question, nor is there any other reason for the inversion to be used.

    Regards,

    Slava
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Hello Believer

Please tell me what is the difference between these two forms of verb constructions?

It should be "Please tell me the difference between these two forms of verb constructions." (Please also note that a comma is not required.)

What is the difference between these two forms of verb constructions?
You want:

What is the difference between ...?
Please tell me the difference between ...


In the second form is is unnecessary, but if you insist on using it:

Please tell me what the difference is between ...

The progressive forms ( -ing) suggest that the action is continuing over a period of time -- is happening as we speak. The simple forms (in the present, as you have them here) suggest that some sort of habitual action occurs, or that no action is involved, merely location: The formula is given below. This topic is discussed below.

CJ
What is the difference between ...?
Please tell me the difference between ...

In the second form is is unnecessary, but if you insist on using it:

Please tell me what the difference is between

Please tell me the difference between ... is the only correct version. Why add "is" if it is not necessary?
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You really must ease up on this absolutism! You'll end up with some sort of stress-related condition!
When it comes to language one is almost never right when one says "X is the only correct version". Emotion: smile

Why add "is" if it is not necessary?

How can one answer except with another question?
Why add spices to food or hang pictures on walls if these are not necessary?

CJ
You really must ease up on this absolutism! You'll end up with some sort of stress-related condition!

When it comes to language one is almost never right when one says "X is the only correct version".

Can you tell me the difference between 'delusion' and 'illusion'? is short and simple.

One need not be verbose by asking Can you tell me what the difference is between 'delusion' and 'illusion'? Verbosity is one of the things to avoid in English usage.

Of course, if the speaker insists on the long-winded version, no one can stop him.
if the speaker insists on the long-winded version, no one can stop him.
So true! Emotion: smile
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