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Shouldn't "is going to" be "will" like the first one that is "will"?

"Furthermore, there is another problem: delay. For example, for n = 1024, there are 10 switching stages from the CPU to the memory, and another 10 for the word requested to come back. Suppose that the CPU is a modern RISC chip running at 100 MIPS; that is, the instruction execution time is 10 nsec. If a memory request is to traverse a total of 20 switching stages (10 outbound and 10 back) in 10 nsec, the switching time must be 500 picosec (0.5 nsec). The complete multiprocessor will need 5120 500-picosec switches. This is not going to be cheap."

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anonymousShouldn't "is going to" be "will" like the first one that is "will"?

No.

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I have a different, perhaps unusual, interpretation. I believe the difference between this usage of 'will' and 'going to' is stylistic.

'will' is cool; 'going to' is warm.

anonymousThe complete multiprocessor will need 5120 500-picosec switches.

This is a cool, impartial, neutral, scientific view of what is necessary. It fits with the preceding technical talk.

anonymousThis is not going to be cheap.

This is change of viewpoint. It goes from highly technical, scientific talk to plain, ordinary practicalities in a warm and lighthearted style. That's signaled by the change from 'will' to 'going to'.

CJ

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Comments  

Is "will" conditional "will"?

No, it is describing a future condition.


I'm sad now, but tomorrow I'm going to be happy. It's my birthday and all my friends will be celebrating with me.

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Do you mean that the text is about future? But I think it is explaining that this scheme isn't good for a larg N like N=1024, so we shouldn't use it for large N

The complete multiprocessor will need 5120 500-picosec switches.

This is not going to be cheap. ==> A processor with that many picosecond switches (If we actually build it) is going to be very expensive.

Thanks a lot AS, this is what I meant

I meant since it's conditional we should use "will" not "is going to", why they used "is going to"?

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It is just a very common saying that engineers and entrepreneurs use when they know that they have a really neat gadget on the drawing board, but getting the money to build it is a problem.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.