+0
I'm from Asia and I can say that in developing countries like mine, there's not very much laws for the copyright and the illegally distributing copyrighted products.

We can download anything, share anything (of course not something that go against the country); from softwares, movies, music, photos, cracks, ... And that's why every shopping sites are always fraid of selling, exchanging with us, maybe even block our IP so that we cannot access to their websites.

I think that it is wrong, illegal but our lives is still poor and if we have to spend so much money on the copyright, we are not even be able to live.

So, how about your country? What do you think about the Copyright? Share with us.
1 2
Comments  
Hello Beautifulife

I am from France.

Here is a simple example.

Let's pretend that I decide to make a movie.

The cost of making my movie will be 25 million Euros. (Of course, you know that you can't make a movie for free...)

I bring together several people that are willing to invest their money in my project. They invest their money because they want to earn a profit. In order to make a profit we need to earn back more than 25 million Euros. The way you do this is to sell tickets to the movie and sell DVD copies of the movie after it has been shown for a certain amount of time in cinemas throughout the world. Naturally, I copyright my work because it is mine and I have invested all my money in the project.

Suddenly, on the streets of xxxx city in Asia you can buy a DVD of my film for $2 and on the Internet you can download it for free. Consequently, nobody buys tickets to my movie and nobody buys the DVD. I lose all of my money - but you have a free copy of my hard work in your DVD player, iPad or computer.

Is this fair?

You say: "I think that it is wrong, illegal but our lives is still poor and if we have to spend so much money on the copyright, we are not even be able to live."

I say: Being poor is no excuse for breaking the law and stealing my work and my money. Being from a third-world developing nation does not give you any right just take what is not yours. I cannot steak from you - why do you think you can steal from me?

John
Thanks John for wonderful answer.

Your English is really really good, I must say.

Of course I know about the copyright things, and it is totally wrong to download and sharing those products.

But when you know about a movie, you haven't have the chance to see it and someday, you walk around on the street and catch up with a DVD of this movie for just 2 dollars, will you buy it or not? At that time, will you think about the copyright?

I think that if you are not a creator then you are consumers and typical consumers always want to get it free.

I say that my country is developing, poor so we can't care enough about the copyright, because a lot of important and neccessary things of lives are still missing.

My English is not so good and somehow, what I say is not totally what I mean.

What I want to discuss here is: Does your country protect the copyright and if yes, is it strictly? For example if you buy or download an uncopyrighted product on the street or on the net, will you take any fine?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
beautifulifeWhat I want to discuss here is: Does your country protect the copyright and if yes, is it strictly? For example if you buy or download an uncopyrighted product on the street or on the net, will you take any fine?
Hello Beautifulife,

I was born and educated in the United States but I immigrated to France nearly 30 years ago. English is my native language. I'm not French by birth; I'm just a citizen of France.

Concerning your quote above, the answer is yes. If you download free movies, for example, from one of the pirate sites, the government has a special agency charged with surveying IP addresses and their activity. The maximum fine for illegal downloading is 243,000 € (two hundred forty three thousand Euros). The law authorizing this surveillance is called the Hadopi law and was approved by the majority of the parliament last year. Is this law respected? I cannot say for certain. But the fine exists and if you do download illegally, you can go to prison and you'll have to pay up to 243k Euros in fines.

We do not share the culture of “something for nothing” that seems to be acceptable to so many people. We take counterfeiting very seriously and prosecute, for example, those that try to import fake Louis Vuitton, Prada, Lacoste and other goods. When I return home from overseas, I frequently see people stopped at customs trying to smuggle huge suitcases full of all sorts of fake trademarked merchandise.

You say: "I think that if you are not a creator then you are consumers and typical consumers always want to get it free." This is absurd - where I come from, the majority of consumers want to pay only the best, FAIR price. Nobody really wants anything for free. Everyone knows it is wrong to want something for nothing. It is morally corrupt and reprehensible. Do you think that any portion of the $2 paid for a pirated street video goes to the rightful owner of the copyright? Of course not. It goes directly into the pockets of a local "businessman" who thinks it's perfectly alright to steal and break the law because he has no morals, social responsibility or propriety. Somehow, this reasoning has become acceptable to entirely too many people who possess the technology to reproduce and steal from others.

You say: "I say that my country is developing, poor so we can't care enough about the copyright, because a lot of important and neccessary things of lives are still missing". What important and necessary things are still missing? DVD players? Flat screen plasma TVs? SmartPhones? iPads? PlayStation? People are living in cardboard huts with no running water and not enough food and you think that you should be able to download the latest version of Windows for FREE so you can surf the Net and entertain yourself? Have you no shame?

I do not know what country you come from or what your culture is, but I am certain that stealing is not permitted and that temptation is frowned upon.

You yourself say it best: "Of course I know about the copyright things, and it is totally wrong to download and sharing those products." After saying that, how can you justify saying anything more?

John
Copyright law fails, generally, to reflect what a great many people feel is morally permissible.

The popularity of The Pirate Party confirms this.

BTW, have you ever considered why almost every public library provides a photocopy machine right alongside their thousands of copyrighted books? lololol
Dear Mike,

I was very surprised to see this thread bumped back up for discussion, and I'm glad it can still generate comments. Thanks for your interest.

You have raised an interesting point about morality. Just because a great many people feel that many things are morally permissible does not make them morally permissible. Some things are wrong no matter how popular they are or whether they are in vogue. Here in Europe - oh yes, and in Asia too, many people felt that it was morally permissible to support, fight and die for Fascism and right wing regimes in the 20th century. We all know how that turned out. I'm not familiar with The Pirate Party and I do not know how popular it is, but I do look forward to reading their website.

About photocopy machines in libraries; are they free? I think they are provided for users to photocopy a page or two, maybe even a chapter. Sort of like the 30 second snippets available on iTunes.

I work with authors who spend their lives performing vital research in medicine and then write about it in peer-reviewed journals. When they sell their article to a publisher they have every right to expect royalties from the sale of their work. When I see PDFs of their work freely available on certain websites it always hurts a little to know that so many people think it's morally permissible to take what's not theirs.

Sincerely,

John
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
On the whole, I agree with JohnParis. The original poster was interested to hear how common copyright piracy or digital rights infringement is outside her country.

In Finland, it is perfectly legal to make a copy of a CD or a DVD for personal use or a friend if it isn't copy-protected. Making copies for sale is prohibited. Finnish libraries usually have thousands or even tens of thousands of CDs and DVDs, and it's all right for anyone to borrow a CD and to make a copy of it if you need not use a special software programme to circumvent the protection.

However, there is a special organisation called [url=http://www.hyvitysmaksu.fi/Teosto/hymysivut.nsf/wpages/index_en.html ]TEOSTO [/url] for artists and composers. TEOSTO gets a certain amount of money for every blank CD, DVD, cassette, computer hard drive etc. that people buy in Finland. The organisation pays the money it gets to people working in the entertainment business: artists, composers etc. TEOSTO gets the money even if I buy a DVD and use it to save photos I have taken myself on it. So, it's only fair that I am allowed to copy music in exchange for the money I have to pay to TEOSTO.

Many people who travel a lot do buy blank CDs and DVDs abroad, of course, and TEOSTO gets no money from them. No system is perfect. There is very little piracy of any kind in Finland. No major department store has pirated movies for sale, but I think I could find an illegal copy of a movie here if I really had to. The internet knows no boundaries and I think people who are interested in pirated material resort to it.

I wouldn't watch most of the modern-day movies even if I could do that for free!Emotion: smile Infringement of digital rights is no problem for me. The last time I saw a movie in a movie theatre was about ten years ago.

CB
The last post to this thread, before my last one (about 6 hours ago), was made 106 days ago. And suddenly, you feel the need to make a post which in no way references or is pertinent to the one I made earlier today? Hello? lolol

Fair enough :-)

The last time I went to a movie theater was also more than ten years ago. What does that say? Perhaps it says the we, like MANY other peoople, find our entertainment via 'alternative' methods.

When the 'system' criminalises a significant proportion of the populace for common daily activititties, then the system is broken!
Mike in JapanThe last post to this thread, before my last one (about 6 hours ago), was made 106 days ago. And suddenly, you feel the need to make a post which in no way references or is pertinent to the one I made earlier today? Hello? lolol
I didn't have your post in mind when I wrote mine but you can conclude what I think of your opinions from what I said. I said I agreed with JohnParis, and he disapproves of illegal copying of CDs and DVDs. Consequently I disapprove of that, too.

No, it wasn't your post that aroused my interest at all. It was beautifulife's question: So, how about your country? What do you think about the Copyright? I replied to that. Not to your post. I thought other people from various countries might tell us about the situation in their countries. Maybe some will, maybe not. If not, I won't have lost anything.

CB
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more