"is" doesn't seem to be a verb like (say) "runs" insofar as it isn't qualified by an adverb. If it's not a verb, what is it? Examples:

This food is good.
This car is running well.
In English, "This food is well" is wrong which seems to indicate that "is" is not quite a verb. In Tamil, both verbs ("is" and "runs") are qualified by an adverb:
= this food well is
= this car well runs
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O czasie 2004-06-13 19:32, taki/taka jeden/jedna M. Ranjit Mathews wzi±/ê³(a) i napisa³(a) :
"is" doesn't seem to be a verb like (say) "runs" insofar as it isn't qualified by an adverb. If it's ... an adverb: = this food well is = this car well runs

Not every verb must be qualified by an adverb (vide to smell, to look).

there's no kaangut. it's only yourself.
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"is" doesn't seem to be a verb like (say) "runs" insofar as it isn't qualified by an adverb. If it's not a verb, what is it?

"Is" is the 3rd person singular of the verb "to be", so it's certainly a verb. In English - as in other Germanic and IE languages - "to be" is highly irregular and has many special functions, but that doesn't change the fact that it's a verb.
Examples: This food is good. This car is running well.

An example of the special function of "to be", which is what causes the irregular grammar. However you can't deduce from its irregular grammar that it's not a verb, as verbs are not defined as "must be modified by an adverb".
Regards

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"is" doesn't seem to be a verb like (say) "runs" insofar as it isn't qualified by an adverb. If it's ... an adverb: = this food well is = this car well runs

This food is quite good.
Is as copula can be modified by semantically appropriate adverbs- quite, somewhat, very, pretty, way (colloquially).
This car is running very well.
(really, the verb there is 'is running')

john
= this food well is = this car well runs

This food is quite good. Is as copula can be modified by semantically appropriate adverbs- quite, somewhat, very, pretty, way (colloquially).

You folks have pretty much covered it.
I had intended to offer, "The food definitely is." or even the "The food is definitely good." but
you have covered this class.
Certainly, surely, work this way too.
"is" doesn't seem to be a verb like (say) "runs" insofar as it isn't qualified by an adverb. If it's ... an adverb: = this food well is = this car well runs

*Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary,* 11th ed., shows "be" to be an "intransitive verb" and a "verbal auxiliary." Examples of the latter usage given in the entry are: "the money was found," "he is reading," "I am to interview him today," and, in an archaic usage "Christ is risen from the dead."
How does MWCD11 define a "verbal auxiliary"? As "an auxiliary verb."

At
http://www.bartleby.com/68/41/641.html
under the entry "AUXILIARIES, AUXILIARY VERBS," in his *Columbia Guide to Standard American English," Kenneth G. Wilson includes "be" in his list of auxiliary verbs or "helping verbs." He points out that "Many grammars assert that auxiliaries are not verbs at all, since they behave differently from verbs: most of them have no past participles such as verbs have."

I expect that the average educated speaker of American English would find nonsensical the assertion that "be" in the examples I gave above is not a verb, since he would have been taught in school that it is.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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M. Ranjit Mathews :
"is" doesn't seem to be a verb like (say) "runs" insofar as it isn't qualified by an adverb. If it's ... indicate that "is" is not quite a verb. In Tamil, both verbs ("is" and "runs") are qualified by an adverb:

'qualified by an adverb' is not a qualification of a verb.

A verb needs a subject, even if it is impersonal, implied, or tacit (like with gerunds):
the car => is running
the food => is good
it => is raining
((one=>) trying) to learn a language
((people =>) smoking) is dangerous.
note that the () groups are a (hidden)subject-verb combination, which in turn acts as a subject for the whole phrase.
A verb may need
- an object (transitive verbs) :
The man is reading => a book
- a predicate (your problem here :-)
The food is => good
Smoking is => dangerous
It appears => the truth
He became => a soldier
- nothing else (intransitive verbs)
It is raining => (nil)
The car is running => (nil)
Some verbs may be used transitively and intransitively: people smoke.
people smoke cigarettes.
I'm reading.
I'm reading a book.
The transitive and intransitive verbs (not the ones with a predicate) may be accompanied by an adverb, or an adverbial group, as may be adjectives and other adverbs:
people smoke much, they smoke too much.
smoking a lot is dangerous.
the car is running out of fuel.
this food is quite good. (quite goes with good, not with the verb is) you did it very well (well goes with did, and very with well)

guido
http://home.pi.be/~pin12499 /
This food is quite good. Is as copula can be modified by semantically appropriate adverbs- quite, somewhat, very, pretty, way (colloquially).

Except that in this case, quite modifies good, and not is.

Today the food is good.
fills the bill, however.
This car is running very well. (really, the verb there is 'is running')

James Kanze
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M. Ranjit Mathews : 'qualified by an adverb' is not ... if it is impersonal, implied, or tacit (like with gerunds):

A verb doesn't always need a subject. What is important is that, in English, a sentence needs a verb. Some sentences consist of a single verb:
sleep.
Most, except for imperative sentences, do require a subject as well.
the car => is running the food => is good ... in turn acts as a subject for the whole phrase.

I don't see where there is any need for a hidden subject for a gerundive. In general, impersonal forms of the verb (infinitives, participles, etc.) don't need subjects.
A verb may need - an object (transitive verbs) : The man is reading => a book - a predicate (your problem here :-)

That's a strange use of the word predicate. I would consider something like "is reading the book" a predicate.
In modern terms, a sentence consists of either a verbal proposition, or a nominal proposition and a verbal proposition. In classic terms, replace verbal proposition with predicate, and nominal proposition with subject. But only when they refer to the complete parts of a sentence (or rather a clause).
The food is => good Smoking is => dangerous It ... an adverbial group, as may be adjectives and other adverbs:

Any verb can take an adjective:
Today the food is good.
etc.
people smoke much, they smoke too much. smoking a lot ... very well (well goes with did, and very with well)

I think that the real difference between "to be" and related verbs is that their complement refers to the same thing as the subject. There is an identity between "the food" and "good". With the result that 1) if the complement is a modifier, it is an adjective, rather than an adjective, and 2) historically, and in the languages which still make the difference, the complement is also in the nominative. (FWIW, when I was in school, up until about the fifth grade, teachers tried to teach that the correct form was "It is I", and not "It is me". In German, I still say "Ich bin es", or "Ich bin ein Mann", with both sides in the nominative.)

James Kanze
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Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung

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