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Due to national holiday I couldn't send the documents
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anonymous Due to a national holiday, I couldn't send the documents.

Or: I couldn't send the documents due to a national holiday.

CB

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"Due to" needs a noun to refer to. Something is due to a cause. When you use "due to" the way you have, it sounds like you jumped out of the frying pan (the pedestrian "because") into the fire (misused "due to"). Write "Because of the national holiday, I couldn't send the documents."

anonymous"Due to" needs a noun to refer to.

The noun is "holiday" on the OP's sentence. This is what Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary says about "due to":

Using Due to: Usage Guide

The objection to due to as a preposition is only a continuation of disagreements that began in the 18th century over the proper uses of owing and due. Due to is as grammatically sound as owing to, which is frequently recommended in its place. It has been and is used by reputable writers and has been recognized as standard for decades. There is no solid reason to avoid due to.

Examples of due to in a Sentence

Evening classes were cancelled due to heavy snow. CB
Cool BreezeThe noun is "holiday" on the OP's sentence.

No, it isn't. The thing that was due to the holiday is the noun that is missing; "I couldn't send the documents" is not a noun. It would have to be "My not sending the documents was due to the national holiday. Your MW usage guide comment is well taken, but there are still some of us for whom the usage grates on the ear, and that might be a solid reason to avoid it.

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