+0
My mother is in the kitchen cooking dinner.(1)
Is it a gramatical sentence?
and what does it mean?
I think it should be "My mother is in the kitchen to cook dinner"(2)

and what is the difference between (1) and (2)?

thank you very much
have a nice day
+0
Hi guys,



My mother is in the kitchen cooking dinner.



Let me suggest another way to think about the question of a comma in this sentence.



A comma represents a pause in speech. It's easy to forget that fact when we get involved in discussions like this, but essentially all the grammatical rules relating to commas try to explain why we pause or don't pause.



So, would I pause after 'kitchen'?

When I first saw the sentence above and 'spoke it in my mind', I didn't pause. The result is that both pieces of information about my mother (in the kitchen + cooking dinner) receive equal importance. When I think about it, I could indeed pause after 'kitchen'. However, the result of that would be to reduce the importance of 'cooking dinner' in the statement. So, it depends on my intention in making the statement.

I'm not arguing in the least that all the rules for when one should write a comma are unimportant. They are very helpful, particularly for English learners who can't simply 'speak a sentence' to see if there is a natural pause. What concers me is just that, in such discussions. it's very common to forget that written language represents speech. Instead, commas seem to take on a life of their own, in which speech is completely forgotten!

Best wishes, Clive
1 2
Comments  
"My mother is in the kitchen cooking dinner."
This is grammatically correct. In this case it means that your mother is performing the action of cooking dinner right now. What is she doing? She is "cooking dinner."

You could say "My mother is in the kitchen to cook dinner," but if you say it this way, you are stating more of a reason why she is in the kitchen. If you say it this way, why she is doing this is more important than what she is doing.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Yes, both are grammatically fine, but the first technically requires a comma before 'cooking'. Otherwise, 'cooking dinner' could be understood to modify 'kitchen' instead of 'my mother' -- however strange that would be.

My mother is in the kitchen, cooking dinner. She is in the kitchen, and she is busy cooking dinner now.

My mother is in the kitchen to cook dinner. She is in the kitchen, and her purpose of being in the kitchen is to cook dinner, but she is not necessarily cooking right now -- she may be chatting.
ferdisYes, both are grammatically fine, but the first technically requires a comma before 'cooking'. Otherwise, 'cooking dinner' could be understood to modify 'kitchen' instead of 'my mother' -- however strange that would be.
Ummm....not exactrly! The first question: My mother is in the kitchen<,> cooking dinner. The comma actually stops the flow of the sentence. It should not be there. Grammatically, [cooking dinner] is a particple phrase modifying the main clause which is [my mother is in the kitchen]. Particple phrase is adverbial in nature. It provides additional information to the main sentence.

Secondly, "My mother is in the kitchen [to cook dinner]" is not something natives would say and is considered unidiomatic (perhaps even wrong) even though it may look grammatical.
dimsumexpressUmmm..not exactrly! The first question: My mother is in the kitchen<,> cooking dinner. The comma actually stops the flow of the sentence. It should not be there. Grammatically, [cooking dinner] is a particple phrase modifying the main clause which is [my mother is in the kitchen]. Particple phrase is adverbial in nature. It provides additional information to the main sentence.
According to me, it (cooking dinner) is simply a participle phrase functioning as an adjective modifying 'mother'. Because it modifies 'mother' and not 'kitchen', a comma is required. Cooking dinner, my mother is in the kitchen. My dinner-cooking mother is in the kitchen. As far as I know, there is no such thing as an adverbial participle phrase in English.
dimsumexpressSecondly, "My mother is in the kitchen [to cook dinner]" is not something natives would say and is considered unidiomatic (perhaps even wrong) even though it may look grammatical.

Isn't it a perfectly fine answer to the question:

Why is your mother in the kitchen?
My mother is in the kitchen to cook dinner.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

Cooking dinner - doesn't modify "kitchen". It modified the whole main clause.

ferdis

According to me, it (cooking dinner) is simply a participle phrase functioning as an adjective modifying 'mother'. Because it modifies 'mother' and not 'kitchen', a comma is required. Cooking dinner, my mother is in the kitchen. My dinner-cooking mother is in the kitchen. As far as I know, there is no such thing as an adverbial participle phrase in English.

Accoding to you, there is no such thing as "adverbial phrase". BUT, yes, there is. I've provided 2 links below for your reference.


Adverbial Phrases

An adverbial phrase is a group of related words which play the role of an adverb. Like all phrases, an adverbial phrase does not include a subject


Perhaps, this may help you clear the confusion.

http://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/participle_phrases.htm

http://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/adverbial_phrases.htm

ferdis

Why is your mother in the kitchen?

My mother is in the kitchen to cook dinner.


For discussion purpose, let's look at it from another angle: My mother is cooking dinner [in the kitchen]. Now, [cooking dinner] is no longer a particple functioning adverbially but a present particple in progressive tense. The meaning hasn't changed. Agree? And, [in the kitchen] is a prep. phrase modifying the present progressive sentence.

Preposition phrase and participle phrase are called adverbial phrase collectively.

dimsumexpressAccoding to you, there is no such thing as "adverbial phrase". BUT, yes, there is. I've provided 2 links below for your reference.

Perhaps, this may help you clear the confusion.

http://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/participle_phrases.htm

http://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/adverbial_phrases.htm
I never said there is no such thing as an adverbial phrase (or a prepositional phrase functioning as adverb). What I said is that there is no such thing as a participle phrase functioning as an adverb. A participle phrase always functions as an adjective. And "cooking dinner" is a participle phrase because it starts with a participle here.

These links support my argument Emotion: smile
dimsumexpressFor discussion purpose, let's look at it from another angle: My mother is cooking dinner [in the kitchen]. Now, [cooking dinner] is no longer a particple functioning adverbially but a present particple in progressive tense. The meaning hasn't changed. Agree? And, [in the kitchen] is a prep. phrase modifying the present progressive sentence.

Preposition phrase and participle phrase are called adverbial phrase collectively.

Again, a participle can not function as an adverb.

Your sentence has a completely different structure.

[My mother] [is cooking] [dinner] [in the kitchen.]

Here, is cooking is the present continuous verb. 'Dinner' is an object noun, and 'in the kitchen' is a prepositional phrase functioning as an adverb (adverbial phrase) modifying 'is cooking'.
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
ferdis
Again, a participle can not function as an adverb.

But it can function as an adverbial phrase to modify the main clause!

Your sentence has a completely different structure.

It appeared to me that you didn't understand the point of my making your sentence present progressive, and I illustrated clearly what each part of the structure does.

[My mother] [is cooking] [dinner] [in the kitchen.]


ferdisWhat I said is that there is no such thing as a participle phrase functioning as an adverb. A participle phrase always functions as an adjective. And "cooking dinner" is a participle phrase because it starts with a participle here.

I wanted to show you [cooking dinner] and [in the kitchen] are both adverbial phrases, and [cooking dinner] is a participle phrase which is also a type of adverbial that you said you never heard of.

Tommy is in his room [playing video games]. By your definition, the blue underlined is adjectival. Is that my understanding? I see it as a participle phrase.

Tommy is playing video games [in his room] - The red underlined is a prep. phrase and I think we can agree. So you see the structure and the sentence components changed places. But the meaning is retained. Now [Playing video games] phored from being a particple phrase to a present partciple describing what Tommy is doing.

Perhaps, we acquired our English from different sources and apparently, one of us is misinformed or confused. As far as a "mother is in the kitchen [to cook], is concerned, you approved it as correct, and I already expressed my opinion otherwise. I just want to clarify the points to the leaners.

The explanations contained in the 2 links should have given any reader a good idea what the difference and similarity are between adverbs and adverbial phrases, and how they behave.
ferdisThese links support my argument

I have no further comments.Emotion: shake

Show more