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You may find it wise to refrain. (original)

Hi, Is 'to refrain' a prepositional phrase that acts as an adverb and would it be correct if I rephrase the original sentence as 'To refrain, you may find it wise'. ?
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It sounds wrong to say a dichotomy might be 'absolute'.

Is this rephrasal of the above sentence correct ' To say (that) a dichotomy might be absolute sounds wrong.' ?
Hi,

You may find it wise to refrain. (original)

Is 'to refrain' a prepositional phrase that acts as an adverb No, it's not prepositional, it's an infinitive. The structure is adjective + infinitive. eg That news is wonderful to hear.

would it be correct if I rephrase the original sentence as 'To refrain, you may find it wise'. ? No, you are 'breaking the connection' between wise and to refrain.



It sounds wrong to say a dichotomy might be 'absolute'.

Is this rephrasal of the above sentence correct ' To say (that) a dichotomy might be absolute sounds wrong.' ? Sounds fine.

Best wishes, Clive
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Clive
Hi,

You may find it wise to refrain. (original)

Is 'to refrain' a prepositional phrase that acts as an adverb No, it's not prepositional, it's an infinitive. The structure is adjective + infinitive. eg That news is wonderful to hear.(Hi, a structure consisting of adj+inf is an adjective phrase ?)

Best wishes, Clive

K.O.It sounds wrong to say a dichotomy might be 'absolute'.

Is this rephrasal of the above sentence correct ' To say (that) a dichotomy might be absolute sounds wrong.' ?

This is possible, but it sounds rather over-formal and dated:

To refrain, you may find wise.
"Saying (that) a dichotomy etc..." ?
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Doesn't the "refrain" sentence sound better if we mention what we refrain from?
PieanneDoesn't the "refrain" sentence sound better if we mention what we refrain from?

(Most modern North American style guides now recommend using fewer commas rather than more, so when faced with the option of using a comma or not, you may find it wise to refrain.) If I'm not wrong, 'wise to refrain' serves as an object complement in the sentence, and it serves as a subject complement in its revised version 'It is wise to refrain.' Doesn't it seem identical with the sentence 'He was anxious to join the party' or 'It is wrong to say a dichotomy might be absolute'?
I'm not a pro with abstract grammar words, but now I see the context of your sentence, no, there's no need for the "from" complement - with the context.
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