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There were two words," with the latter being a link.

Why are prepositions followed by ing verbs?
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The usual explanation is that, because only nouns (or pronouns) can be objects of prepositions, the only form of a verb that can be the object of preposition is a gerund.
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I think I would say that with acts more like a conjunction in this context. It introduces a participial phrase/clause.

with the latter being ...
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Note how confusing your first question was, though:

You asked

Why are prepositions followed by ing verbs?

and then when you get an answer, you say, "Well, as a matter of fact the preposition in my sentence wasn't followed by an ing verb" So why did you give that example with that question if the two don't even go together?!!! Hee!Emotion: smile

Do you want to know why prepositions are followed by ing verbs? Or do you want an explanation of the sentence you quoted?

CJ
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Comments  
But in the setence in question isn't the object of the preposition 'the latter', while the ing phrase is a participle modifying that?

Isn't this different from when the noun following the object is a possessive noun and the ing form is a gerund?
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Well, as a matter of fact the preposition in my sentence wasn't followed by an ing verb"

I don't think I said that. I just thought it was a participle, not a gerund.

I wanted to know why a preposition was followed by an ing verb, whether it be a participle or a gerund was irrelevent. Sorry, my questions are probably far from clear. I do try my best though Emotion: smile

Btw, I agree. It does look like a conjunction, since it doesn't appear to modify anything in the main clause and could easily be replaced by and, if being were changed to a finite verb.
English 1b3I don't think I said that. I just thought it was a participle, not a gerund.
OK. Got it.
English 1b3It does look like a conjunction, since it doesn't appear to modify anything in the main clause and could easily be replaced by and, if being were changed to a finite verb.
Yes. That's the idea.

CJ