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Please, I'd like to know if the following is considered natural to say:

(during a ride in a taxi - talk between a cab driver and a passenger - just some parts):

- Are you feeling all right?

- Would you like that I turn on the air-conditioning? (or just: May I turn on the air-conditioning?)

- Come on in! (please, here why is it used the preposition in? Isn't it something redundant?)

Now when the passenger reaches his destination, the cab driver says:

"Here we are" (is there any other way?).

And to say how much is the ride the taxi driver says:

"Sir (lady), the ride costs $ 23.10" (or) he simply says: "That's $23.10, sir (lady)" ?

Thanks,
Joshua
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If I were a cab driver, I would be sensitive to what the passenger wants. Sometimes they do not want to talk to the driver, but think about their business. Sometimes they would like to make small talk.

I would ask
Before starting (May I help you with your luggage? Do you need help getting in? Please relax and make yourself comfortable.
Are you in a hurry to get to your destination? (If they have extra time, and they are a visitor to your city, you can ask would you like to go by a scenic route that is not out of the way?).

Are you comfortable? Is it too hot or too cold for you? Would you like me to turn on (up) the heat (air conditioning)?
When you reach the address - "We are at (give the address such as 1123 Main street, or name of the place, such as Plaza Hotel, or the passenger departure terminal for United Airlines) "Is there a special place you would like to be dropped off?"
"the fare is $23.10" Do you need a receipt?
Hi,
You guys obviously live in places where cab drivers are more chatty.

Here's what I typically hear in a cab, from the time I get in to the time I get out.

Me: The Toronto Reference Library, please.

. . . .
. . .
. . .

Me: Thank you. Keep the change.

Clive
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Hi Joshua
Anonymous- Are you feeling all right?
I would expect this question to be asked if the speaker suspects or has reason to believe that the other person is currently feeling sick.
Anonymous- Would you like that I turn on the air-conditioning? (or just: May I turn on the air-conditioning?)
The cab driver might ask this: "Would you like me to turn on the air-conditioning?" This sentence is an offer, not a request.

"May I turn on the air-conditioning?" is a polite way to ask for permission to turn the air-conditioning on. This sentence is a request.
Anonymous- Come on in! (please, here why is it used the preposition in? Isn't it something redundant?)
"Come on in?" would normally be used to invite someone into your home, for example. And, no, the word "in" is not redundant. The expression "Come on!" has several possible meanings, but with the addition of the word "in", the only meaning would be an invitation to enter someone's home (or similar sort of place). I would not expect to hear "Come on in!" from a cab driver. Sometimes people say "Hop in" when they've agreed to give a friend a lift somewhere.
My own experience with cab drivers is that they don't ever actually invite you into the cab at all. Instead they simply expect you to get in.
Anonymous"Here we are" (is there any other way?).
That's OK. Another possibility might be "This is it."
Anonymous"Sir (lady), the ride costs $ 23.10" (or) he simply says: - "That's $23.10, sir (lady)" ?
I'd say the most likely sort of sentence would be somethiong like this: "That'll be $23.10."
CliveMe: The Toronto Reference Library, please.

. . . .
. . .
. . .

Me: Thank you. Keep the change.
I'm with Clive 100% on this one.

CJ
CalifJimI'm with Clive 100% on this one.
Me too. My experience with cab drivers and cab rides is that conversation between driver and passenger is pretty darn minimal.
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Thank you, Alphecca Stars.

Best wishes,
Joshua
Thank you, Yankee! By the way concerning the change do we say:..and here it is your change or and here is your change? You also said "That'll all be ....But can I also say That is...? (concerning the price of the ride = fare).

Joshua
Hi Joshua

There is a good chance a cabbie might not say a single word when giving you change.

A cabbie might possibly say "Here's your change". Or the passenger might hand the cabbie $25.00 (for a $23.10 fare) and say "Keep the change", which I think is the more likely scenario.

I would not expect a cabbie to say "Here it is" when giving change unless the passenger first asked a question such as "Where's my change?".
AnonymousYou also said "That'll all be ..But can I also say That is...? (concerning the price of the ride = fare).
There are various things that might possibly be said. "That'll be $23.10" and "That's $23.10" are both possible. (Note: that'll = that will)
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