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Please, could you tell me if “nor” is incorrect here? I have doubts in these four different cases:
1) Susan didn’t want any soup NOR any beer.
(I want to say: Susan wanted neither any soup nor any beer = Susan didn’t want any soup or any beer either = Susan didn’t want any soup or any beer)

2) NOR Liz or Robin came to the party. (I want to say: Neither Liz nor Robin came to the party = Liz and Robin didn’t come to the party either = Liz and Robin didn’t come to the party = Both Liz and Robin didn’t come to the party)

3) She said she would contact me but she didn’t write NOR phone.
(I want to say: She said she would contact me but she neither wrote nor phoned = She said she would contact me but she didn’t write or phone either = She said she would contact me but she didn’t write or phone)

4) She won’t come with me, NOR with her friend. (I want to say: She will neither come with me nor with her friend = She won’t come with me, or with her friend either = She won’t come with me, or with her friend)
And thank you in advance.
Eladio
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Well, why don't you say 'what you want to say' (in the parentheses)-- which are the correct ways? Your 1-4 are not correct.

1) Susan didn't want any soup or any beer.
2) Neither Liz nor Robin came to the party.
3) ... she didn't write or phone. / ... she neither wrote nor phoned.
4) She won't come with me or her friend. / she will come with neither me nor her friend.
Comments  
Thank for your answer and your time, Mister Micawber. Well, really I was trying to know if there were another way to say the same in a simpler form, without the use of "neither" or "either", both of which, for some reason, I try to avoid in spoken English. May it be I'm a little compulsive or obsesive in studying English.
Eladio