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What is the difference between the following two sentences?

1. Mr. X has died.

2. Mr. X is dead.

I know the first sentence is present perfect. So you could say it just after the death of Mr. X.

I think the second sentence is fine too. You could use it just after the death of Mr.X.
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Hello, Rotter,

It's a little weird, but 1. is about an action: "Mr (no dot after Mr) has just died". (he has just passed from life to death), whereas 2. is about a state, or a condition: to be dead/alive/healthy/sick aso...

So yes, both are right, but different.
Thanks pienne
So what is the difference. It seems you can't figure out the difference.

You wouldn't write Mr. Rotter, would you?

How about a medical doctor? I met Dr. Frans in June 2005.

Would you write Dr. Frans?
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No, I wouldn't. The reason is that the "r" is the last letter of the whole word, so you don't need a dot.

"Mister" > Mr / "Doctor" > Dr / "Mistress" >Mrs

When the last letter of the abbreviation is the same as the last letter of the whole word, there's no dot; when it isn't the same, there's a dot (period, full stop).
PieanneNo, I wouldn't. The reason is that the "r" is the last letter of the whole word, so you don't need a dot.

"Mister" > Mr / "Doctor" > Dr / "Mistress" >Mrs

When the last letter of the abbreviation is the same as the last letter of the whole word, there's no dot; when it isn't the same, there's a dot (period, full stop).

Sorry, Pieanne, but that's a French rule, not an English rule. Mr. Mrs. and Ms. all take a period. Miss does not.
Philip
Pieanne
No, I wouldn't. The reason is that the "r" is the last letter of the whole word, so you don't need a dot.

"Mister" > Mr / "Doctor" > Dr / "Mistress" >Mrs

When the last letter of the abbreviation is the same as the last letter of the whole word, there's no dot; when it isn't the same, there's a dot (period, full stop).

Sorry, Pieanne, but that's a French rule, not an English rule. Mr. Mrs. and Ms. all take a period. Miss does not.

In British publications and business correspondence, interestingly, it's now more usual to omit the period in "Dr", "Mr", "Mrs", "Ms", etc.

MrP
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RotterSo what is the difference.

You would use the present perfect to express a connection between the "act" of dying and the present, e.g. (from Google):

1. Veteran BBC broadcaster John Peel has died at the age of 65...

[It's breaking news.]

2. If someone close to you has died, you probably feel overwhelmed with grief...

[The dying is still felt to be a current event.]

3. It is very sad that he has died, he was important to lots of people.

[It's current news.]

"He is dead", on the other hand, simply expresses the fact, as Pieanne says. You can only say "he has died" of a recent event, or a generalised event (as in #2). But with "he is dead", there are no time restrictions. Once you have died, you are dead.

MrP