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Which one is correct?


She WAS the best person I have ever seen, but we have lost connection for years

She IS the best person I have ever seen, but we have lost connection for years


At the moment of speech, I still think that she is/was the best person, but "she" has disappeared in my life for long time I am talking about a past event.

Comments  

Such questions are confusing to me in English. I really think that both should be correct, f you just add a full stop at the end. In my understanding, if you say: "She WAS the best person I've ever seen~." It means at the time, in the past, she was the best person you've ever seen, but it doesn't necessarily mean that now, in the present, she's not. We just don't know; she might still be the best person and she might not. However, the listener would most likely think that she's still the best person. It depends on the context and the way you speak about her.

What confuses me is that I tend to use WAS because you've lost connection with her for years, and I tend to use IS because you want to focus on the fact that she's still the best person you've ever seen. That's why I think both should be correct.

Anyway, the safest is to use the second one.

anonymousWhich one is correct?

They both are, except that you lost contact, not connection.

anonymousAt the moment of speech, I still think that she is/was the best person, but "she" has disappeared in my life for long time I am talking about a past event.

"At the moment of speech, I still think that she is/was the best person, but "she" has disappeared in my life for a long time. I am talking about a past event."

Right, so you don't even know whether she is still alive and would welcome "is". "Was" is usual by the ordinary process in English speech known as backshifting ( https://www.thoughtco.com/backshift-sequence-of-tense-rule-in-grammar-1689017 ). We don't always think things through logically before we start talking (listen to any presidential press conference), and it is not always logical to use the present tense, anyway, as here.