My aunt was Jewish, and a notable aspect of one of my cousin's accent was that she pronounced the "g" in words like "sing" the sound was the same as the "g" in "England". I don't recall her two sisters doing the same, but I knew them less well. (I also can't recall how my aunt pronounced such words.)
Lacking anything else to go on, I always figured that this was a marker from my cousin's Jewish background, but seem to recall being told many years ago that the two don't correlate at all.
But now I've heard a track by Janis Ian "I Hear You Sing Again" (which can be heard at http://www.janisian.com/mp3 downloads.html) and she clearly sounds the "g" in "sing". I believe Ian is Jewish (original surname "Fink"), but from a farm in New Jersey so the only link between her and my cousin is the Jewishness.
Is sounding the "g" in "sing" Jewish, or a regional quirk?

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
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My aunt was Jewish, and a notable aspect of one of my cousin's accent was that she pronounced the "g" ... link between her and my cousin is the Jewishness. Is sounding the "g" in "sing" Jewish, or a regional quirk?

In Lamerica it's a feature that has been associated with some Ashkenazic speakers in the New York City area (Largest Speech Community in America) this is what's behind jokes about "Lawn Guyland" and so forth. I personally have noticed it, but I don't think it's extremely prevalent except among speakers who already had very strong regional accents, if you follow me.
I've noticed some non-Ashkenazic Lamerican speakers using (Ng) for /N/ too, but I think it's generally just an idiolectal quirk. For example, there was a fellow in my high school of Portuguese ethnicity (and I believe Portuguese was his native language) who did the (Ng) thingg.
Subject: Is pronouncing the "g" in "sing" regional or cultural? From: Harvey Van Sickle Is sounding the "g" in "sing" Jewish, or a regional quirk

A friend of mine from Doncaster (England) pronounces the "g" in words like that. Here it's a regional thing.
Peasemarch.
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Is sounding the "g" in "sing" Jewish, or a regional quirk?

Certain regional accents in northern England always realise /N/ as /Ng/. You don't say anything about the provenance of your Jewish relatives, so I don't know if this has any relevance.

Regards,
Mark Barratt
This late afternoon GMT, Areff (Email Removed) wrote, in part, regarding /Ng/:
In Lamerica it's a feature that has been associated with some Ashkenazic speakers in the New York City area (Largest ... have noticed it, but I don't think it's extremely prevalent except among speakers who already had very strong regional accents

Aha! My phonetics teacher when I took phonetics in college, a grad student, insisted that no one pronounced the , so I don't. (That was his clear meaning: since no one does, I don't.) I, at the time, insisted that I do; I still think I do. (Perhaps interested parties can check my recording, http://math.wustl.edu/~msh210/recording.html , and see whether they too think so.)
Incidentally, RF, what is this "Lamerica" to which you keep referring?

Michael Hamm, an Ashk'nazi
AM, Math, Wash. U. St. Louis
(Email Removed) Standard disclaimers: http://math.wustl.edu/~msh210/ ... legal.html
My aunt was Jewish, and a notable aspect of one of my cousin's accent was that she pronounced the "g" ... link between her and my cousin is the Jewishness. Is sounding the "g" in "sing" Jewish, or a regional quirk?

Regional, I'd say. Jewish people of my acquaintance from the north of England do so but I'm a Londoner and I don't.
Fairly unusual to find Jews who farm in New Jersey, I'd have thought.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
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Subject: Is pronouncing the "g" in "sing" regional or cultural? From: Harvey Van Sickle Is sounding the "g" in "sing" Jewish, or a regional quirk

A friend of mine from Doncaster (England) pronounces the "g" in words like that. Here it's a regional thing.

Don't they also do it up Sheffield way?
A friend of mine from Doncaster (England) pronounces the "g" in words like that. Here it's a regional thing.

Don't they also do it up Sheffield way?

Isn't it mostly associated with Burr-bid-gum, though? Whenever I hear it I'm reminded of Beryl Reid's Marlene.

Ross Howard
Don't they also do it up Sheffield way?

Isn't it mostly associated with Burr-bid-gum, though? Whenever I hear it I'm reminded of Beryl Reid's Marlene. Ross Howard

Yes, it's not pronounced only in Doncaster, of course. And even in the areas where the "g" is pronounced, many people, perhaps most, won't pronounce it. Sheffield has a surprising variety of accents.
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