Hello, normally in American English we put the dollar sign before the
number, like
$1000
I am writing a software application, where it would be better for formatting and space maintenance if I put in displays, the dollar sign
after the number, like this:
1000$
Do you think this would be understandable, or confusing, to most people??
Do you think this is would be a definite English error, or could it be
defended as a matter of intentional style designed for a particular purpose (saving space and laying things out better).
Thank you for your opinions.
Mark
Hello, normally in American English we put the dollar sign before the number, like $1000 I am writing a software ... of intentional style designed for a particular purpose (saving space and laying things out better). Thank you for your opinions.

It would cause the user to think that the software was designed by someone unfamiliar with US English. That, in turn, would make them wonder if there were other "errors". I would recommend against it.

Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
1000$ Do you think this would be understandable, or confusing, ... a particular purpose (saving space and laying things out better).

It would cause the user to think that the software was designed by someone unfamiliar with US English. That, in turn, would make them wonder if there were other "errors". I would recommend against it.

I wouldn't assume so on ecountering that in a tabular display, especially if other units and the like appeared in the same column. It might even be apparent how the layout was improved by the practice. But I would indeed consider it odd in running text.
French-Canadians write the dollar sign after the number, but they also use a comma for the decimal point and separate groups of figures with spaces.

Odysseus
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
It would cause the user to think that the software ... if there were other "errors". I would recommend against it.

I wouldn't assume so on ecountering that in a tabular display, especially if other units and the like appeared in ... after the number, but they also use a comma for the decimal point and separate groups of figures with spaces.

OK, then I would think that the software was designed by a French-Canadian and that I could not enter data in English. My interest would be pantoute.

Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
I am writing a software application, where it would be better for formatting and space maintenance if I put in displays, the dollar sign after the number, like this: 1000$ Do you think this would be understandable, or confusing, to most people??

It would be incorrect, of course; but would be understood by most people.

The problem would be about trust, not understanding.

If your site is selling things, I suspect your conversion rate would be higher if your visitors felt sure that YOU understood the currency. People hesitate to spend; they hesitate more if they feel they are dealing with something strange.

Andrew
http://www.wordskit.com /
http://www.flayme.com /
Hello, =A0normally in American English we put the dollar sign before the number, like $1000 I am writing a software ... be defended as a matter of intentional style designed for a particular purpose (saving space and laying things out better).

I recommend against it. Many countries use the $. You will want to consider the US$, the HK$ and many more, including Canada, Australia, and Singapore. A euro is a euro, but a $ is not necessarily a $.

GFH
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Mark Galeck 's wild thoughts were released on Sat, 6 Sep 2008 21:20:14 -0700 (PDT) bearing the following fruit:
Hello, normally in American English we put the dollar sign before the number, like $1000 I am writing a software application, where it would be better for formatting and space maintenance if I put in displays, the dollar sign after the number, like this:

As an developer myself I'm confused at how it helps with 'space maintenance'
As a general rule of thumb with these things, if you're doing it to make it easier for you then it's probably the wrong thing to do.
1000$ Do you think this would be understandable, or confusing, to most people??

I'd probably not even notice is most cases.
J
Do you think this is would be a definite English error, or could it be defended as a matter of intentional style designed for a particular purpose (saving space and laying things out better). Thank you for your opinions. Mark

Jan Hyde (VB MVP)
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Jan.Hyde