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Sentence: Don't know for better or worse, but it appears the whole Maldives will a theological state in next 10-15 years.

My question: Is it right to use the adverb "next", the way I've, used in the sentence? Or should it be said like this: "...will a theological state by 2020"?

Beside do I need to use the preposition "of" before the Maldives? If yes why so? What is a
difference between "whole Maldives" or "whole of Maldives"?

Thanks and regards Emotion: smile
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Hi,

Sentence: Don't know for better or worse, but it appears the whole Maldives will become a theological state in the next 10-15 years.

My question: Is it right to use the adverb "next", the way I've, used in the sentence? It's OK as I've edited it.

Or should it be said like this: "...will become a theological state by 2020"? Also OK.

Beside do I need to use the preposition "of" before the Maldives? Yes

If yes why so?

What is a difference between "the whole Maldives" We don't talk about place names like this, eg the whole Canada.

or "the whole of the Maldives"? We talk about place names like this, eg the whole of Canada.

'The Maldives' is one of those places that has a plural kind of name,

eg The United States, The Maldives.

Clive
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Ok. Learned many things from your reply. It was very helpful, specially the definite article part. But if you permit me to digress I would like to know why some countries names take articles and some not?
Hi,

Basically, it's idiomatic. But some comments . . .

Often, it's because the name includes a word that is really a common noun,

eg The United States of America

eg The United Kingdom.

'The' also tells us I'm talking about The United States, not The United Kingdom

'The' is also often (always?) used when the name is plural,

eg The Netherlands

eg The Maldives.

Clive
Ok. Got the point.
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