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Hi

A few guys on the train were beating another guy. An elderly man decided to intervene. One of the bullies said to him: "Now, what you're gonna do old man, is say you're sorry for bothering us and you're gonna turn yourself around and go sit down if you know what's good for you. Otherwise I'm gonna have to kick your ass too".

I have a problem with that "is say". I'm not sure how to understand it.

Although I don't get that "is say", I think the sentence says: If you know what's good for you you should better say you're sorry for bothering us, turn around and go back and sit down.

The elder guy refused and the bully replied: OK, just so's my kicking your ass won't be over too fast, I'll only use one hand."

Does "so's" mean "so is"? I think these sentences are not written correctly as far as grammar is concerned.

Thanks
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It's perfectly idiomatic. "Say" is the bare infinitive.

What you're going to do is this: etc.

What you're going to do is to sit down.

Your paraphrase is okay, except we say "You had better do X."

"So's" is slang for "so that." It's also a bit coloquial.
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...what you're gonna do.... is say you're sorry....

Subject: What you're gonna do
Verb: is
Subject complement: say you're sorry

Does "so's" mean "so is"? -- No, 'so as' (= so that)
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Comments  
Mister Micawber...what you're gonna do.... is say you're sorry....

I haven't noticed that. Now it sounds easy Emotion: big smile

Thanks guys!
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