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When someone pulled the cat's tail, it hissed angrily.

Is the sentence grammatically correct?

Thanks in advance.
Comments  
Hi YL,

I'm sure someone will pop up and say "Oh, no! The way you have it written, it sounds like the TAIL is what hissed, not the cat."

I say "nonsense" to that. It is perfectly clear that the cat is what hissed.

I would have no trouble with this sentence. You could, as I'm sure you know, write it as "The cat hissed angrily when someone pulled its tail."
I would say meowed instead of hissed.Emotion: big smileEmotion: big smile Am I one of this people GG?
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Hi,

When someone pulled the cat's tail, it hissed angrily.

Is the sentence grammatically correct? I assume you're thinking about the placement of 'it'. This kind of thing is so commonly said that it seems OK to me. The meaning is clear, since tails don't hiss. However, consider
When the kitten pulled the cat's tail, it hissed angrily. Here, you'd need to say either

When the kitten pulled the cat's tail, the cat hissed angrily

or When it (or 'the kitten') pulled the cat's tail, the kitten hissed angrily.

Best wishes, Clive

Thanks Barbara and Clive for your explanations.

Doll, I think you hiss, not meow.
?? I was talking about the cat not myself.Emotion: big smile
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A meow is a friendly sound. A hiss is an angry sound.
I don't think the cat was feeling particularly friendly after having its tail pulled, so I think we should stick with hissed! Emotion: smile

CJ
We should definitely stick with 'hissed'. Emotion: smile

By the way, there is this slang expression used in (part of? all of?) the US:
hissy fit
Yes. There's a hissy fit, and then there's a conniption fit (or conniptions), and I've been told that only people from North Carolina know the difference between the two! (I don't!)

CJ
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