+0
is this sentence a future tense too?

a) My sister is going to get married with Jacob this October.

One more thing, do we must put past tense after 'get' ?
+0
a) My sister is going to get married with Jacob this October. is this sentence a future tense too?-- Yes, it is the 'be going to' future.

One more thing, do we must put past tense after 'get' ?-- It is not the past tense; it is the past participle, which is part of the formation of the 'get' passive verb: get drunk, get married, get buried.
Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Hi,

1) Many grammarians of the English language usually say that there are only two tenses, past vs. non-past or past vs. present. They say that there is no 'future tense' but many constructions which are used to refer to future events.

In this point of view, many future reference expressions such as 'is going to V ..., will V ..., be to V ..., be about to V ..., etc.' are not 'future tenses'.

So,

'My sister is going to get married with Jacob this October.' This sentence is in present tense referring future event.

But school grammars, or ESL grammars (usually based on prescriptive and traditional grammars) tend to teach there are three tenses, or 12 tenses (including progressive(be -ing) and perfect(have+p.p.).) If you take this stance (that is, if you think 'will' is a future tense), then the tense of this sentence is future.

In brief,

Academically, No.

Practically, Yes.

2) 'married' here is not a past tense form, but a past participial form such as 'gone' or 'taken'.

[get+p.p.] is a special type of passive.

After a while, she got frightened. (cf. She was frightened.)

CW Lee
do you mean cf (complete future) ?
No. 'Cf' is the abbreviation for Latin confer, meaning 'compare'. He is asking you to compare the two sentences.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.