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Student: I only have my TOEFL score taken last week. Is it enough ?
Information Center: No, you need to take GMAT if you want to submit us your candidacy.
Student: What I need to do now, please ?
Information Center: University's application deadline will open again next month, you still have time taking GMAT.
Student: Thank you.
What I need to ask is:

- I only have my TOEFL score taken last week. Is it enough ? ( Is it grammatically correct to put past participle in that position.)

- University's application deadline OR University application deadline. ( Which one is correct ? I'm not sure about that. )

- you still have time taking/to take GMAT. ( Which one is correct ? I think "taking" is as correct as "to take" in this context. )

Thank you.
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Nor Priest- I only have my TOEFL score taken last week. Is it enough ? ( Is it grammatically correct to put past participle in that position.)
No. It's I've only received my TOEFL score last week, or I've only taken the TOEFL last week. I think you mean the first of these.
Nor Priest- University's application deadline OR University application deadline. ( Which one is correct ? I'm not sure about that. )
It's The university's application deadline.
Nor Priest- you still have time taking/to take GMAT. ( Which one is correct ? I think "taking" is as correct as "to take" in this context. )
You still have time to take ... is correct. You still have time taking ... is wrong.

CJ
Comments  
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I have 2 questions, please.

No.1

I want to clear up about 'past participle'. For example, I remembered looking on some texts in the TOEFL exam regulation.

It says 'please use pen or pencil given at the test center'

or even at the train station 'the map shown on this board is bla bla bla...'

What I'm confused is how can they put 'past participle' after words without putting indicator in front of them. For example,

'please use pen or pencil given at the test center' --Vs.-- 'please use pen or pencil which is given at the test center'

'the map shown on this board is ...' --Vs.-- 'the map that is shown on this board is ...'

So why can't I use 'I only have my TOEFL score taken last week.' ?
No. 2

I remember reading , I start running , I never get bored watching. I spend time thinking.

Above sentences are all grammatically correct.

Why can't I use 'I have time preparing'

Are there exceptions with that ?

Thank you.
Nor PriestI want to clear up the matter about 'past participles'.
OK. I understand your problems.

The pencil given at the test center implies that someone gave the pencil.
The city map shown here implies that someone showed the map.
The newspaper story written yesterday implies that someone wrote the story.

Note in the examples above the relationship of the noun to the past participle that follows.
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Now for your example.

My TOEFL score taken last week implies that someone took the score.

The word choice is wrong. We don't say "take the score". We say "take the exam". So you can talk about
the TOEFL exam taken last week. That implies that someone took the exam, which is correct. You need something like this:

I only have my score for the TOEFL exam taken last week.

By the way, you can't skip a word and say that my TOEFL score taken last week implies that someone took the TOEFL.
Look at the example above with city map. The city map shown here can't mean that someone showed the city. It can only mean that someone showed the map.

CJ
Nor PriestI remember reading , I start running , I never get bored watching. I spend time thinking.

Above sentences are all grammatically correct.

Why can't I use 'I have time preparing'
Each verb (start, remember, want, ...) or group of words with a verb (get bored, spend time, have time, ...) has its own grammatical rule when another verb follows.

1 In some cases only the infinitive can come next.
2 In some cases only the -ing can come next.
3 In some cases both the infinitive and the -ing are possible.

Examples of type 1 are want, decide, have time.
Examples of type 2 are avoid, spend time, get bored, keep.
Examples of type 3 are like, prefer, start.
____________________________

So the short story is that 'have time' (Type 1) goes in a different pattern than 'spend time' (Type 2).

I don't have time to finish the job. / I spend a lot of time working on my car.
I'll have time to help you tomorrow. / Lucy spent time helping her sister wash the dishes.

CJ

If you want to learn more about these combinations of verbs, look up material on catenative verbs.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thank you very much CalifJim.

I'm clear now.

By the way, thanks for the lesson you gave. It would take a while to learn.

Emotion: smile