Hi! I'm writing an argumentative essay on the following topic: Acts of terrorism are justifiable.
I have a problem concerning the last sentence of
the first paragraph.
Is the sentence correct? '' it seems reasonable for a high values-led society to refer to humanitarian reasons and other moral aspects in saying 'no' to terrorists.
Is it possible to say ''high values-led society"?
Is it a grammatically correct sentence? Does it make sense?

I would be grateful for any any help or advice.Thanks.

best regards,
Mariusz
Hi! I'm writing an argumentative essay on the following topic: Acts of terrorism are justifiable. I have a problem concerning ... Is it a grammatically correct sentence? Does it make sense? I would be grateful for any any help or advice.Thanks.

It makes (English) sense to me, in that I understand what you're trying to say, but adjectival constructions of the 'high-values-led' type can cause confusion. And it raises the question of whether such societies are led or driven by 'high values', whatever they are. I'd try something like "... it seems reasonable for a society driven/led by high (moral/ethical?) values to refer...)", if you want to keep most of the words that you've used.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Hertfordshire
England
Thank you for Your help dr Robin Bignall.
It's good to know that you can find here such educated people willing to help.;-)
best regards,
Mariusz
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Hi! I'm writing an argumentative essay on the following topic: Acts of terrorism are justifiable. I have a problem concerning ... to humanitarian reasons and other moral aspects in saying 'no' to terrorists. Is it possible to say ''high values-led society"?

Yes. But I think the concept is unclear. What do you mean? Are religious values "high value"? Or do you mean putting a high value on material comforts? Was Afghanistan under the Talaban (sp?) a "high values-led" society? I am sure that the members of the Talaban thought so.
Is it a grammatically correct sentence? Does it make sense?

Yes, but the style need work.
I would be grateful for any any help or advice.Thanks.

If you would be more clear about what you mean by a "high values-led" (and I would agree with another poster that you should use "high-values-led") posters would be in a better postion to make suggestions.
Keep in mind that your thesis (Acts of terrorism are justifiable.) is very complex. How can one be "pro-life" and support capital punishment? If I saw a man about to murder another man, I would feel justified in using deadly force to stop that murder. So, is is justified for "pro-life" people to use deadly force to stop abortions? I say NO!!! But I do recognize the inconsistency. (BTW, I am a libertarian, thus "pro-choice", or said better "none of my business".)
GFH
Is it possible to say ''high values-led society"? Is it a grammatically correct sentence? Does it make sense?

In any case, in this construction "value", used as part of an adjective, has to be singular, even if it refers to more than one value.

If you mean a society living on a high montain, led by values, say "high value-led society".
If yoy mean a society led by high values, say "high-value-led" society.

If it is important to you that people should understand what you are saying, say "a society led by high values". Multi-hyphenated adjectives can have their uses, but I would avoid it here.
An example of a muli-hyphenated adjective would be if, for example, you were talking about somebody's holier-than-thou attitude.
Xakero
If you mean a society living on a high montain, led by values, say "highvalue-led society". If yoy mean a society led by high values, say "high-value-led" society

I wasn't aware such a slight difference changes the sense. One hyphen makes such a difference?
If it is important to you that people should understand what you are saying, say "a society led by high values". Multi-hyphenated adjectivescan have their uses, but I would avoid it here.

You may be right. It's seems safer not to use them.

Thanks for your help Xakero. If you happen to be writing in Polish and have a problem,you can count on me .;-)
catch you later ;-)
Mariusz
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To most Americans, it probably won't make a difference, but then you'd best eliminate all hyphens.
To illustrate what difference a hyphen can make I have scanned and uploaded (171 KB) to http://snipurl.com/aaqq some pages from "Eats, Shoots & Leaves" by Lynne Truss, a book that makes highly entertaining reading. I trust that the publishers will forgive me this copyright violation, as it is designed to entice readers of this post into buying the book (I get no commissions)

Consider, for example, what difference the hyphen makes to those engaged in "extra-marital sex" or "extra marital sex".
In your phrase, without the first hyphen the society is high, not the values.

Xakero
Thanks! The books is definitely worth reading especially for those writing in English. I know the remark is obvious but at the moment as a part of my Writing classes I'm obliged to write an essay every two weeks so it might appear useful. Such a gentle difference and the sense is different. I'll look for the book in my local language bookshop and who knows mayby I'll purchase it if the price is acceptable.;-)
best regards,
Mariusz