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Is the sentence "the newspapers tattled on what was happening" natural and grammatically correct?

I once asked about this, but I haven't gotten any clear answers till now.

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You can tattle on a person to someone else, but the newspapers cannot tattle on what was happening. It tattled about what was happening. Still, I don't like the word "tattle" in this context.

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'tattle' is almost a children's word. In adult company you'll hear it once or twice every fifty years.

See https://fraze.it/n_search.jsp?q=tattle&l=0

Check out the definitions and images at the bottom of the page.

CJ

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Comments  
Englishmaven

You can tattle on a person to someone else, but the newspapers cannot tattle on what was happening. It tattled about what was happening. Still, I don't like the word "tattle" in this context.

Thank you very much.

1. He tattled on what was happening.

2. He tattled on what we did.

Are these sentences natural and grammatically correct?

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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No, you tattle on the one who did something wrong.

My brother tattled on me when he saw me take the last cookie.

If you tell a lie, I'll tattle on you to Dad.