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Are UK speakers still using the auxiliary verb "shall"?

"Shall I bring you a cup of tea?"

I was learned to say this phrase in the approximately meaning of "Should I bring..."
But if the verb "shall" is not being used anymore, may be I can say: "Will I bring you a cup of tea?" Although it seems strange a little in that meaning, doesn't it?

In short I wonder if I can say "shall", "should" or "will" in the sentence above and what the difference is.
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[Y]
Hello!

I got confused here. First of all "shall" has two meanings, right? 1. shall = will. E.g. I shall marry you next year. (Something you will do in the future.) 2. shall = should/ supposed to. E.g. My teacher said I shall wait here until he comes back with my paper. (I am supposed to wait, he told me I should) Or: Buy flowers, dress nicely, organize a limousine... what else shall I do for the party?

So, you YoHf say shall can only be used in the first person of singular (I) and in the first person of plural (we). Does this rule count for both meanings of shall??

I ask because I have just heard in a TV show: "You shall watch no more!"

Thank you .

Jake
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Hi, Jake!

Yes, you are right, "shall" has two meanings. And as I understand, the second meaning (shall = should) is used now. At the same time the first meaning (shall = will) is used seldom if ever.

Is that what you wanted to know?
As a rule of thumb, in British English:

"Shall" is used for questions and suggestions in the 1st person:

1. Shall I pick you up at 6?
2. Shall we have a beer first?

Stressed "shall" is also used in all persons to show that the speaker is determined that something will happen (often in a humorous or petulant way):

3. You shall go to the ball!
4. I shall stay at home, if I want to!

Unstressed "shall" is also used in formal contexts, with a sense of "obligation":

5. The vendor shall be required to provide an abstract or guarantee of title.
6. You shall on no account divulge the contents of this letter to a third party.

Some native speakers also reserve "shall" for the 1st person where a simple future meaning is intended:

7. I shall be home at 6 o'clock.
8. We shall probably see you at the station.

(This is sometimes presented as a rule; but if it is a rule, it's a rule that most native speakers ignore.)

MrP
RuslanaAre UK speakers still using the auxiliary verb "shall"? "Shall I bring you a cup of tea?" I was learned to say this phrase in the approximately meaning of "Should I bring..." But if the verb "shall" is not being used anymore, may be I can say: "Will I bring you a cup of tea?" Although it seems strange a little in that meaning, doesn't it? In short I wonder if I can say "shall", "should" or "will" in the sentence above and what the difference is.
Yes, it is being used.
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"Shall" is, I think, still used in tag questions, for example,

"Let's go, shall we? ";

"Have a move, shall we? ";

"Let's stop here, shall we? "

"I'll come and see you on Monday, shall I ?"
Yes, it's still used in tag questions – in BrE, anyway!

MrP

PS: For your second example, "Let's make a move!" would be more usual.
Hello Mr P, I am just a new comer from Myanmar(Burma). But, I think, or should I say I am sure, only "shall we?" is used after "Let's... " the question tag. Raymond Murphy wrote, in his "English Grammar in Use", " Let's go for a walk, shall we? "

In tag question, "would" (and "will, won't, can, can't, could) is(are) used in tag question only after imperatives.

Bring me a ruler, would you ?

Open the window, will you ?

Shut up, can't you ?

Do sit down, won't you ?

Anyway, thank you very much in deed.
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You're welcome, K!

I think that's generally true about "let's"; though you don't often hear a tag after it.

Sometimes people say "okay":

1. "Let's discuss it later, okay?"

It's less deferential than "shall we?". It sounds more forceful than a "suggestion".

MrP
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