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I have two sentences that have 'straight.'

In ❶, it's easy to say 'straight' is adjective.

But in ❷, it's not easy to tell whether it's adjective or not.
In some way it seems adjective, in other way it seems adverb.

❶ With its tiny winding lanes and hidden temples, Jaisalmer is straight out of The Arabian Nights.

❷ This is why ice cream does not taste that sweet straight from the fridge, which is why ice cream makers add stacks of sugar-as you can tell all too clearly when ice cream melts.

Can you give me the clue?

(One more thing, it seems we can put in some complementary words between 'sweet' and 'straight' so as to make the sentence understood better.
If you agree with me, can you help me to complement words?)
I know there's a disagreement in terms of word class even between dictionaries.

For example, in the below sentence. Longman dictionary of contemporary English says 'worth' is preposition, and Webster leaner's dictionary says adjective.

▪ This art collection is worth a fortune.
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In #1, 'straight' is an adverb modifying 'out of TAN'.
In #2, 'straight' is an adverb modifying 'from the fridge'.

In both cases, straight = directly, immediately.

For example, in the below sentence. Longman dictionary of contemporary English says 'worth' is preposition, and Webster leaner's dictionary says adjective.-- Yes, this sometimes happens; some words float in a vague zone between word classes.
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Thanks. Mister Micawber.
Thanks again.
Mister MicawberIn #1, 'straight' is an adverb modifying 'out of TAN'.
In #2, 'straight' is an adverb modifying 'from the fridge'.

In both cases, straight = directly, immediately.

In #1, as an alternative analysis, could you see the element 'straight out of The Arabian Nights' as an AdjP with 'straight' as its head, and the PP complement 'out of The Arabian Nights' as its dependent? The copular verb 'be' is normally followed be a predicative complement (typically adjectival), so the AdjP 'straight out of The Arabian Nights' could reasonably be seen as expressing a property assigned to the entity referred to by the subject 'Jaisalmer'.

BillJ
I realize that copulars are usually followed by nouns or adjectives, but adverbials are common: She's in the kitchen. I think your argument is unlikely, Bill, but I also know that grammarians look at structures in different ways.
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