Hi,
I seem to remember having heard the word "stressy" in contexts like "This was a stressy week." or "a stressy job". However, I couldn't find this word in my dictionary. So, my question is: Does this word actually exist in English? Or what would be appropriate synonyms?

Regards,
Peter
1 2 3
Hi, I seem to remember having heard the word "stressy" in contexts like "This was a stressy week." or "a ... in my dictionary. So, my question is: Does this word actually exist in English? Or what would be appropriate synonyms?

Googling for 'stressy' finds "about 19,600" hits. On the pages I've looked at most instances use stressy with the meaning 'stressful', or with some other closely related meaning.
If you have heard or read a word being used in English then it does "actually exist in English".

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.e.u)
Hi, I seem to remember having heard the word "stressy" ... actually exist in English? Or what would be appropriate synonyms?

Googling for 'stressy' finds "about 19,600" hits. On the pages I've looked at most instances use stressy with the meaning ... meaning. If you have heard or read a word being used in English then it does "actually exist in English".

And the ending -y is often used to make new words in ordinary speech.

Mike.
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Hi, I seem to remember having heard the word "stressy" in contexts like "This was a stressy week." or "a ... in my dictionary. So, my question is: Does this word actually exist in English? Or what would be appropriate synonyms?

Certain endings are productive in English. Not finding all the possibilities in the dictionary might be considered similar to not finding in German language dictionaries all those huge compound words that language uses.

"Throw me that lipstick, darling, I wanna redo my stigmata."

+-Jennifer Saunders, "Absolutely Fabulous"
Hi, I seem to remember having heard the word "stressy" in contexts like "This was a stressy week." or "a ... in my dictionary. So, my question is: Does this word actually exist in English? Or what would be appropriate synonyms?

It is now (runs to unplug computer and is felled by bolt of lightning ...)
It actually exists per OED (though classed as "rare") but with a meaning specific to a particular kind of poetic rhythm:
strEsI) (f. stress n. or v.1 + -y1.)
Characterized by stress, spec. in the prosody of G. M. Hopkins; in which stress is conspicuous.

1880 G. M. Hopkins Lett. to R. Bridges (1955) 107, I think you havemissed the clue. You take the rhythm for three triple time, iambs and anapaests say, and four feet to a line (except the refrain). But to get this you have to skip+a whole foot as marked and stressy as any other foot. 1961 Times Lit. Suppl. 18 Aug. 549/4 Neither of these versions reveals the bold, thoroughgoing 'stressy' flexibility of genuine sprung rhythm.
But I concur with m'learned friends else thread. Adding a "y" is a common trick of English, and once a word is in general use then it exists. The arguments may then begin about whether it is obsolete. rare, slang, dialect etc.
It becomes the Queen's English when the Royal Christmas message begins "It has been a stressy year ..."

John Dean
Oxford
Hi, I seem to remember having heard the word "stressy" ... actually exist in English? Or what would be appropriate synonyms?

Googling for 'stressy' finds "about 19,600" hits. On the pages I've looked at most instances use stressy with the meaning ... meaning. If you have heard or read a word being used in English then it does "actually exist in English".

But does that make it corect, or is it still bad English. It seems to me that almost anyone can invent a word, particlarly a celebrity, and it finds its way into a dictionary and then anyone who doesn't know better may point to it in justification.
Colin
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If you have heard or read a word being used in English then itdoes "actually exist in English".

But does that make it corect, or is it still bad English. It seemsto me that almost anyone can invent a word, particlarly a celebrity,and it finds its way into a dictionary and then anyone who doesn't know better may point to it in justification.

But what's wrong with inventing words? We have a number of recognized ways of doing it with perfect regularity, and the new forms may often be acceptable as formal language.

Mike.
does

If we don't use the right words then we might as well go the whole hog and speak a different language to each other with all the chaos that it might bring. There are lots of things wrong with using an incorrect word. Does decimate really mean devastate?

If a legion were to be decimated then I should expect it to have lost about 10% of its strength, but if a village were to be devastated i should expect it to have lost about 70 or 80% of its strength.

Colin
But what's wrong with inventing words? We have a ... and the new forms mayoften be acceptable as formal language.

If we don't use the right words then we might as well go the wholehog and speak a different language to each other with all the chaosthat it might bring. There are lots of things wrong with using an incorrect word.

That's not at all the same thing as inventing a new one. I won't ask you what the "correct" word for "Internet" would be. Instead, I'll stay with -y. You surely don't refuse to accept "salmony", a colour-word I can't find in my old OED? Or the same word's use, on the analogy of "trouty", to describe a river suitable for, or abundant in, salmon? How else would one describe "strappy shoes"? The formations are perfectly regular: what would be incorrect English, as the language stands at present, would be "salmonaff" or "strappo". It's not a chaotic process, but a disciplined and systematic one.
Does decimate really mean devastate? If a legion were to be decimated then I should expect it to havelost about ... a village were to be devastated i should expect it to have lost about 70 or 80% of its strength.

Having made a fool of myself over that one not long ago, I think we must accept that it's moved on. I choose not to use it at all except in a clear historical context.

Mike.
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