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Hi,

I was looking at Cool Breeze's response to my post and he seems to have said that native teachers are guided by ears but there are some guidelines and one is that the names of restaurants, bars and pubs have the in front of them. He gave these as examples: the Mall Tavern, the Hillgate

Can I apply it (as I see it) to this?

A restaurant named "Kimbab Nara" where Nara can be translated into 'country'.

The Kimbab Nara carries terrific menu items and offers a quite dining experience.
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BelieverThe Kimbab Nara carries terrific menu items and offers a quite dining experience.
Hi Believer

I am glad my comments have proved useful.Emotion: smile However, since there is no adjective in the underlined part of your sentence, the article must be placed afterquite: quite a dining experience.

If there is an adjective, you have a choice with quite:
It's quite a good book.
It's a quite good book.

Cheers
CB
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BelieverHi,

I was looking at Cool Breeze's response to my post and he seems to have said that native teachers are guided by ears but there are some guidelines and one is that the names of restaurants, bars and pubs have the in front of them. He gave these as examples: the Mall Tavern, the Hillgate

Can I apply it (as I see it) to this?

A restaurant named "Kimbab Nara" where Nara can be translated into 'country'.

The Kimbab Nara carries terrific menu items and offers a quite dining experience.
I know of no rule, but I believe that the custom is to include 'the' before the name of the restaurant unless it bears the name of the owner: The Five Point Café vs Andy's Diner. There is also a trend for the "fancier" restaurants to have just the one word in the name: Palisade, Canlis are two that I know of in various places.
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Sounds good to me.
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